Recent Articles:

Morning Headlines 2/20/24

February 19, 2024 Headlines No Comments

To Avoid Bankruptcy, EMR Firm Settles Lawsuit for $4M

Connexin Software, parent company of pediatric health IT vendor Office Practicum, agrees to settle a series of class-action lawsuits related to a 2022 data breach for $4 million.

The doctor will see you now: Auburn’s Rural Health Initiative provides innovative health care access

Auburn University’s Rural Health Initiative will use a USDA telemedicine grant to install telemedicine carts at 14 locations across Alabama.

Omni Family Health experiences ‘attempted cybersecurity incident,’ says no data stolen

Omni Family Health (CA) works to bring its NextGen EHR and other internal systems back online after an attempted cyberattack forced it to downtime procedures last week.

Curbside Consult with Dr. Jayne 2/19/24

February 19, 2024 Dr. Jayne 4 Comments

For the past 20 years or so, I’ve volunteered to work on Super Bowl Sunday so that my colleagues who are die-hard football fans or longstanding party hosts can do their thing. If I’m working in a low-acuity emergency department or in an urgent care, the day is usually slow, although more patients present as soon as the game ends. Back when I was doing my training, I spent one Super Bowl Sunday covering a busy Labor and Delivery unit. It was eerily slow until the end of the half time show, and then things became wild as women headed in after realizing that sheer will power wasn’t going to keep their babies from arriving. Sometimes it’s slow enough to catch at least some of the commercials, but usually I end up reading after the fact about which ones caused the most conversation.

This year, I was surprised to see how many people were talking about healthcare-related commercials. Although most of them were local or regional, at least one ran nationally and received plenty of coverage. Patient advocacy organization Power to the Patients aired a public service announcement featuring rapper Jelly Roll, country performer Lainey Wilson, and singer-songwriter Valerie June. It called for healthcare price transparency and specifically called upon the US Congress to pass laws to support it. Points made during the ad include that 100 million people in the US are “drowning in medical debt” and that the greed of hospitals and insurers is “destroying the American dream.” Reports indicated that the campaign also had planes flying banners through the skies above Las Vegas.

Other organizations making a Super Bowl spend included:

  • Connecticut’s Hartford HealthCare and Yale New Haven Health with competing ads.
  • New York’s Roswell Park Comprehensive Cancer Center.
  • Wisconsin’s Bellin Health.
  • Tennessee’s Niswonger Children’s Network (part of Ballad Health) and St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital.
  • Pennsylvania’s OSS Health.

I understand how organizations want to toot their own proverbial horn, but even the cheapest Super Bowl ad represents a lot of dollars that could be used to do things like provide patient care, support staff, improve facilities, and more. The reality is that organizations spend a tremendous amount of money on advertising. Case in point: A recent article noted that Atrium Health is paying $1.5 million over five years for naming rights at an amphitheater in Macon, GA, stating that “music is a great way to bring people together, and we know that strong social relationships have been associated with improved physical and mental health.” Atrium also paid to name a local minor league stadium in Kannapolis, NC, after the health system. They’re four years into a 10-year deal, so I wonder what kind of return they’re getting on their investment. It seems like an enduring presence at a local facility will get more attention than a fleeting Super Bowl ad.

Hospitals weren’t the only healthcare players getting in on the advertising game. Pfizer had an ad featuring the music of Queen that focused on its vision for the future of cancer care. Astellas Pharma promoted a menopause treatment that retails for $660 per month. MangoRx added an ad for its erectile dysfunction treatments to round out the health-related content. The United States is one of the only developed nations where direct-to-consumer advertising is allowed, and most physicians I talk to wish such campaigns would go away. In my experience, nearly all of the patients who follow the advice to “ask your doctor if drug X is right for you” would benefit from other (usually less expensive) treatments than the one that was featured in a glitzy marketing campaign.

I would be interested to see some industry data that shows how much the average hospital or health system is spending on marketing efforts and what they believe is their return on that investment. For example, we’ve all seen so many renaming and rebranding efforts that it feels like it’s impossible to remember who is who. One of our local hospitals spent a ridiculous amount of money putting a new light-up sign on the top floor of the hospital, replacing the existing light-up sign. This one is 50-percent larger and is borderline distracting when you’re on the freeway, and offers no other redeeming value – not even a conversion to more energy efficient LED lighting.

I continue to see hospitals that are penny wise but pound foolish. One local facility has a significant problem with employee turnover. Nurses are jumping ship because pay isn’t keeping up with local competitors. Instead, nurses are bouncing from hospital to hospital every 12 to 18 months in search of better pay and benefits. The lowest-paying hospital is losing tons of money due to the turnover costs, not to mention the loss of institutional knowledge and community reputation as nurses don’t hesitate to tell friends and family how “cheap” hospital administration is. Sure, administrators have controlled salary costs in the short term, but at what long-term cost? It seems that doesn’t really matter, since there is churn at the administrator level as well and people leave when there are too many questions. Still, the hospital supports various local sports teams, but it’s a sad day when it can’t prioritize reduction in nursing turnover. Another local hospital ended hot food service for overnight workers, which I suspect isn’t going to be a real satisfier for those who are on the night shift.

I’d be interested to hear from anyone who works for one of the institutions who made a Super Bowl ad purchase, or who is a consumer of healthcare in their region. Are you proud that your organization showcased its expertise or are you left scratching your head because you know they’re claiming financial hardships that should exclude a Super Bowl ad from the budget? Even if you don’t have an institutional connection, what do you think about healthcare organizations advertising in general? Leave a comment or email me.

Email Dr. Jayne.

Morning Headlines 2/19/24

February 18, 2024 Headlines No Comments

Dina Raises $7 Million to Expand Digital Care-at-Home Platform and Network

Virtual and in-home care software vendor Dina raises $7 million in a Series A funding round led by Osage Venture Partners.

Independent pediatricians who can’t bill patients during Lurie Children’s outage can apply for loans

Lurie Children’s is offering community pediatric practices emergency loans to help see them through any billing gaps that might occur as a result of the cyberattack that has forced Lurie’s Epic system offline since January 31.

Twin Cities hospital data company hit with cyber attack

Consulting Radiologists says it thwarted a cyberattack last weekend that temporarily interrupted some imaging services at several hospitals.

Monday Morning Update 2/19/24

February 18, 2024 News 1 Comment

Top News

image

Virtual and in-home care software vendor Dina raises $7 million. Osage Venture Partners led the Series A funding round, bringing Chicago-based Dina’s total funding to $11 million.


HIStalk Announcements and Requests

image

Most poll respondents own shares or equity in a health-IT related company, typically one that they’ve had a professional connection to. Demo Chic is of that majority, commenting that, “I have equity in multiple startups where I’ve worked, but zero hopes of actually realizing anything from the blood, sweat, and tears contributed. Maybe a nice-to-have boost in retirement but doubt they will ever amount to anything.”

New poll to your right or here: In light of ViVE kicking off next week in Los Angeles, what do you hope to gain by attending conferences like ViVE and HIMSS? My list of reasons doesn’t encompass every possibility for every type of attendee, so please share your particular goals by leaving a comment.


image

Welcome to new HIStalk Platinum Sponsor Altera Digital Health. A global healthcare IT leader, Altera Digital Health develops and elevates technology to connect and inspire healthier communities. Altera’s approach to our clinical, financial, and interoperability solutions is changing the way healthcare is delivered. Altera designs digital health services that lead healthcare to a higher place, while we guide those we partner with, all along the way. Together, with our clients, we’re bringing next-level healthcare within reach. Thanks to Altera Digital Health for supporting HIStalk.


Webinars

None scheduled soon. Previous webinars are on our YouTube channel. Contact Lorre to present or promote your own.


Acquisitions, Funding, Business, and Stock

image

Amwell reports Q4 revenue of $71 million, with annual revenue of $259 million. An annual net loss of $679 million, plus end-of-year layoffs, were also mentioned in the company’s latest earnings announcement. Amwell is ramping up organizational efforts to begin work on the $180 million Defense Health Agency virtual care contract it was jointly awarded with Leidos back in October.


Sales

  • Virtua Health (NJ) will implement Care.ai’s virtual care technologies across its acute care facilities, beginning with Virtua Our Lady of Lourdes Hospital.
  • Appalachian Regional Healthcare selects the I-Pass clinical care transition bundle as part of the Kentucky Hospital Association Transitions and Communication in Hospitals Program.

People

image

Melissa Prusher (Avaap) joins Nordic Consulting as head of marketing.


Announcements and Implementations

Senior health management technology company Spectator Health adopts e-prescribing capabilities from Surescripts.


Privacy and Security

Lurie Children’s Pediatric Partners Clinically Integrated Network, owned in part by Chicago-based Lurie Children’s Hospital, is offering certain community pediatric practices short-term emergency loans to help see them through any billing gaps that might occur as a result of the cyberattack that has forced Lurie’s Epic system offline since January 31. The practices, many of which use Lurie’s system for billing, can apply for up to $50,000 per doctor.


Other

image

New research from Linus Health finds that the Digital Clock and Recall assessment within its Core Cognitive Evaluation solution outperforms the most commonly used paper-based assessment in detecting early, mild cognitive impairment and dementia.

image

Most digital health companies use standards-based APIs like FHIR when integrating with EHRs, according to research from ONC. Those that connect their apps or software with multiple EHRs use these APIs at higher rates than those that connect to just one. Barriers to adoption of standards-based APIs include high fees, a dearth of realistic clinical testing data, and data elements that are of little interest or value.


Sponsor Updates

  • AdvancedMD’s 2024 Winter Release gives private practices elevated levels of operational agility and more streamlined billing capabilities.
  • Ellkay congratulates customer CommonWell Health Alliance on its QHIN designation.
  • Experity announces the recipients of its Limelight Awards at its 2024 Urgent Care Connect Conference.
  • EClinicalWorks customer Be Well Primary Care Medicine (TX) reports that over 95% of its patients use Healow Sign for faster check-in during office visits.
  • Nym Health celebrates its sixth anniversary.
  • Sectra publishes a new whitepaper, “True SaaS or a Cloudy Promise? A guide to navigating SaaS and achieving imaging excellence.”

Blog Posts


Contacts

Mr. H, Lorre, Jenn, Dr. Jayne.
Get HIStalk updates.
Send news or rumors.
Contact us.

Morning Headlines 2/16/24

February 15, 2024 Headlines 10 Comments

250,000 VA Patients Are at Risk of Receiving Wrong Medication Due to Electronic Health Records Issue

The VA Office of the Inspector General reveals that patient medication histories are not transferring between the Oracle Health EHR used at five VA hospitals and the VistA system used at the VA’s other facilities, putting 250,000 veterans at risk of potential medication errors.

Revolutionizing the Emergency Department: MUSC Health’s new frontier in patient care

MUSC Health (SC) pilots a telehealth triage service at two of its emergency rooms in an effort to help patients get care more quickly, resulting in the rate of patients who leave without being seen dropping to almost zero.

Using AI to automate healthcare claims, RapidClaims launches with $3.1M

Automated medical coding and documentation software startup RapidClaims raises $3.1 million.

News 2/16/24

February 15, 2024 News 2 Comments

Top News

image

Investment firm KKR acquires a co-ownership stake in healthcare payments and analytics vendor Cotiviti from Veritas Capital for $10.5 billion. Buzz about the deal with KKR began circulating several months ago.


Reader Comments

From Beltone: “Being a well-funded, SF-based start-up doesn’t guarantee success in healthcare. Former high flyer Medallion – SaaS provider credentialing – is facing financial challenges. Laid off their US-based provider enrollment team to outsource to India, creating HIPAA and security challenges. And didn’t tell their customers. CIOs and health systems probably deserve to be told that their provider data is moving offshore and back onshore. Health systems are demanding NCQA-certified provider enrollment staffs and going offshore isn’t going to make compliance leadership happy.” The company has raised $85 million since launching in 2020, with its last funding round in 2022. At least one comment on Glassdoor suggests that the company laid off some onshore staff without warning last month.


Webinars

None scheduled soon. Previous webinars are on our YouTube channel. Contact Lorre to present or promote your own.


Sales

  • St Vincent’s Health Australia Private Hospitals will implement Meditech Expanse at its 10 facilities in New South Wales, Queensland, and Victoria.
  • WellSpan Health (PA) selects remote patient management technology from Biofourmis.

Announcements and Implementations

image

Benefis Health System (MT) will roll out Epic next month. Hospital staff say the year-long implementation project has been good for the local economy, generating 1,900 flights, 10,000 meals at restaurants, and 3,300 nights at hotels. The economic bump will continue through the first few weeks of March, when 600 consultants descend for go-live.

Nicklaus Children’s Health System (FL) implements Kyruus Connect online appointment scheduling software from Kyruus Health.

image

Synthesis Health launches with GA of a cloud-native PACS with AI-based reporting module. CEO Murray Reicher, MD founded and led PACS vendor DR Systems for 22 years before selling it to IBM Watson Health in 2015.

Cleveland Clinic leverages technology from Palantir to create an AI-powered Virtual Command Center, the initial iteration of which offers an enterprise view of patient throughput and capacity forecasts, staffing needs, and OR utilization and scheduling opportunities.


Government and Politics

image

The VA Office of the Inspector General reveals that patient medication histories are not transferring between the Oracle Health EHR used at five VA hospitals and the VistA system used at the VA’s other facilities, putting 250,000 veterans at risk of potential medication errors. Though the VA says no veterans have been harmed because of the problem, the OIG says at least one veteran wasn’t given critical medication in a timely manner due to the glitch, and that the VA hasn’t notified patients that their medication records may be incorrect.


Privacy and Security

image

Lurie Children’s Hospital in Chicago restores external email capabilities and most of its phone lines two weeks after a cyberattack on its communication systems. Its Epic system is still offline.


Other

image

Ozarks Community Hospital (MO) abruptly transitions its Evergreen Clinic to a telehealth assistance hub, three weeks ahead of the date originally given to clinic employees. Patients in the area can now see clinicians remotely via virtual visit at the clinic, or travel to other OCH facilities further afield.

image

MUSC Health (SC) pilots a telehealth triage service at two of its emergency rooms in an effort to help patients get care more quickly, resulting in the rate of patients who leave without being seen dropping to almost zero. The health system plans to add secure messaging to the telehealth service so that ED patients can communicate directly with staff.


Sponsor Updates

  • CloudWave will partner with USI Insurance Services to provide cybersecurity and IT services for USI’s PrivaSafe service.
  • Medical Risk Solutions reports a 40% decrease in patient call volume after implementing Healow Open Access online appointment booking software from EClinicalWorks.
  • First Databank names Brad Titus technical writer, Michael Cruz senior cloud operations engineer, and Kate Struthers people operations specialist.
  • Findhelp welcomes Best Buy Health, Pediatric Associates Families of Companies, Merck, and Olympic Community of Health to its network.
  • Aragon’s Research Globe ranks Five9 as a leader of conversational AI in the intelligent contact center.
  • Fortified Health Security hires Georganne Miller (Latitude Information Security) as security compliance advisor.
  • Health Data Movers joins the ServiceNow consulting and implementation partner program.
  • The Career Reconstituted Podcast features Inovalon Director of Sales Engineering Wilson Tam, PharmD.
  • InterSystems earns NCQA’s Certified Data Partner designation for a second consecutive year.
  • Net Health will exhibit at APTA CSM February 15-17 in Boston.

Blog Posts


Contacts

Mr. H, Lorre, Jenn, Dr. Jayne.
Get HIStalk updates.
Send news or rumors.
Contact us.

EPtalk by Dr. Jayne 2/15/24

February 15, 2024 Dr. Jayne 2 Comments

I’m always amazed when people want to use EHRs to drive non-EHR behavior, almost forgetting the concept of free will. A friend reached out to me to ask if I knew how to configure Epic EHR tools to help her track how much time she spends using the EHR on her days off, which includes work done during weekends, holidays, and when on vacation. She said she felt “blown off” by the IT team after opening a help desk ticket since they are only tracking so-called “pajama time” on scheduled clinic days. She feels that tracking the data on weekends and non-clinic days would help motivate her to work less. I explained how IT teams manage their work and how they typically focus on system enhancements that would benefit large numbers of users and explained that she’s essentially asking for a one-off behavior modification program. I offered some options for free time-tracking software on her phone, which I think would be even better, since she will have to consciously decide that she’s going to start her timer and use the EHR versus “just popping in for a moment” as she has become used to doing.

In talking through it, she never thought about using any other way to track her time – such as an old-school notebook or even a time-tracking app. I also mentioned the importance of tracking other time-sucking ways she spends her day, including social media, random internet surfing, online shopping, and more. Sometimes we just need to take responsibility for our own choices, and it’s not always the IT team’s job to figure it out or the EHR’s responsibility to track it. Of course, I know that EHRs have a way of wasting a lot of clinician time, especially if their organizations don’t have policies and procedures in place that allow clinicians to work at the top level of their licensure. However, this particular physician also admits she brings her own laptop to work so she can do things that aren’t allowed on the office computers, so I suspect the problem is much larger than her ending up doing work on the weekends.

image

I recently took over a new volunteer position and was given access to a shared drive full of documents and files with the advice that “everything you need is in there.” The extremely painful process of going through the folders reminded me of how spoiled I have become working for high-performing organizations where version control information is required to be clearly present on every document. Sure, you can access that information electronically from within the applications, but for long-standing documents, that can require a lot of digging. It’s also helpful to see who authored the document, the business reason for its creation, and a high-level overview of key changes that have happened along the way. You can bet that when I hand off the materials to the next person, the documentation will be a little stronger. I’m trying to dig through them with a glass of wine in hand, but I’m afraid my cellar will be empty before I get through all of the documentation.

image

Happy 30th birthday to the Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association. The publication launched in 1994 and has had significant growth during its lifespan. The journal’s 2023 statistics: 1574 submissions received with 254 accepted for publication. Here’s to the next decade of quality clinical informatics literature.

From Cube Dweller: “Jayne, I appreciate your ongoing coverage of the return to office situation. I’m one of those people who has enjoyed being in the office all along, mostly to get away from my children and have a bit of peace and quiet. Now that all these hybrid people are being forced back to the office, our management is making us have all kinds of forced fun to welcome them back. I wish they’d take a page from this article about how to not make it feel like a bad middle school mixer.” I appreciated the content of the article, which shared one company’s idea of a better way to get employees to connect. The employer profiled is Verkada, which provides security equipment. CFO Kameron Rezai created what they call the “3-3-3 program,” which offers a reimbursement of up to $30 each for employees who meet at local businesses in groups of three or more after 3pm. Rezai cited autonomy as one of the goals of the program, stating, “We trusted our employees to go out and make their own connections.”

Since the program’s inception in April 2023, the company has had good uptake, spending more than a half-million dollars from a fund that formerly paid for structured events. As someone who has felt the pressure of trying to plan workplace events that have something for everyone, this feels like a win-win. Want to go hike with your coworkers and get a beer afterwards? Check. Want to visit a local tearoom or coffee shop? Check. Chill at the local gelato shop after a long day of meetings? Check. Staffers do have to post event snapshots before they file their expense reports, which I think would be great for helping others generate ideas. This would also potentially scale to remote workers, who could arrange delivery of snacks and drinks then hop on a virtual meet and greet together. Local businesses also benefit, so that’s another plus.

I’m mentoring a young clinical informaticist, and we have a lot of conversations about study-related concepts such as statistical power, correlation, and causation. There are so many studies out there that “link” different concepts or events together, which may have a tangled web of causes. My mentee brought up a recent Epic Research study that noted that for patients in the emergency department, there was a correlation between providers having access to outside records and a reduced risk of a “code blue” event. The article notes that previous research has shown a link between the presence of outside medical records information and patient outcomes such as visit length, tests and diagnostics that are ordered, admission rates, and even charges.

As someone who has spent a long time working in the emergency department, I understand that piece – having more information helps you better understand a patient’s current state and how their various health conditions have progressed. You can also see if they had recent testing that would reduce what you need to order today, or the presence of data can make a comparison easier. From a code blue standpoint, my experience is that those events are most closely tied to the patient’s current presenting problem: major trauma, heart attack, respiratory failure, etc., and are less closely tied to chronic conditions. As a scientist, it’s fun to find things that correspond, but the best studies are those that generate actionable data that can be used to improve patient outcomes. Maybe I’m missing something here, so if you’re seeing what I’m not, please clue me in.

image

My mentee is also working on a public health project that looks at foodborne illness and came across what can only be described as an attention-grabbing title: The Great Michigan Pizza Funeral. The “ceremonial disposal” of nearly 30,000 frozen pizzas occurred in Ossineke, Michigan on March 5, 1973, following a recall due to concerns about botulism-causing bacteria in mushrooms used to top the pizzas. The pizzas were placed in an 18-foot deep grave with the governor of Michigan in attendance. Later testing revealed that the mushrooms were not indeed contaminated, and that laboratory mice found dead during the initial testing suffered from an unrelated infection.

What kind of pizza would you never eat, unless it was the only food left to sustain you? Which is best – thin crust, thick, or pan? Leave a comment or email me.

Email Dr. Jayne.

Morning Headlines 2/15/24

February 14, 2024 Headlines No Comments

KKR paying $10.5B for Cotiviti stake

Veritas Capital sells a co-ownership stake in healthcare payments and analytics vendor Cotiviti to investment firm KKR for $10.5 billion.

Lurie Children’s Hospital restores parts of communications network knocked offline by ‘criminal threat’

Lurie Children’s Hospital in Chicago restores external email capabilities and most of its phone lines two weeks after a ransomware attack on its communication systems.

Anatomy Unveils AI-Powered Financial Automation for Healthcare Organizations

AI-powered financial automation software vendor Anatomy Financial launches with $7.6 million in funding.

Healthcare AI News 2/14/24

February 14, 2024 Healthcare AI News No Comments

News

image

DeepScribe announces GA of its new Trust and Safety Suite, a set of solutions designed to give users greater visibility into the safety and reliability of its AI-powered medical scribe software.

Persistent Systems develops AI-powered population health management software that identifies social determinants of health based on EHR data and then recommends personalized care interventions.

CitiusTech develops the Gen AI Quality & Trust framework and support service to help healthcare software developers design, implement, and scale vetted AI solutions across enterprise environments.


Business

image

Anatomy Financial launches with $7.6 million in funding. The San Francisco-based company has developed AI-powered financial automation software for medical and dental practices, and digital health and healthcare billing companies.

image

Children’s Hospital of Los Angeles implements Vital’s AI-powered ERAdvisor software as a part of its MyVisit app.


Research

A series of studies presented at the annual meeting of American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons determine that the accuracy of musculoskeletal health information provided by chatbots used by ChatGPT, Google Bard, and BingAI is limited. The chatbots displayed especially significant limitations when asked to provide clinical management suggestions, omitting important steps such as ordering antibiotics before cultures.


Contacts

Mr. H, Lorre, Jenn, Dr. Jayne.
Get HIStalk updates.
Send news or rumors.
Contact us.

Morning Headlines 2/14/24

February 13, 2024 Headlines No Comments

OCH Evergreen Clinic transitions to telehealth hub; Employees say patients are in limbo

Ozarks Community Hospital (MO) abruptly transitions its Evergreen Clinic to a telehealth assistance hub.

Meridian Analytics Rebrands to Discern Health, Focused on Human-Centric Predictive Care

Predictive care analytics startup Meridian Analytics rebrands to Discern Health.

Revolutionary Nursing Practice TogetherTeam Virtual Connected Care comes to MercyOne Dubuque Medical Center

MercyOne rolls out its TogetherTeam Virtual Connected Care virtual nursing program at all five of its hospitals in Iowa.

News 2/14/24

February 13, 2024 News No Comments

Top News

image

ONC and The Sequoia Project designate Kno2 and CommonWell Health Alliance as Qualified Health Information Networks under TEFCA. They join Konza National Network, EHealth Exchange, Epic Nexus, Health Gorilla, and MedAllies, which were designated in December.


Webinars

None scheduled soon. Previous webinars are on our YouTube channel. Contact Lorre to present or promote your own.


Sales

  • Biofourmis signs four contracts with pharmaceutical companies for its digital health and decentralized clinical trial solutions.

People

image

NRC Health promotes Helen Hrdy to chief customer officer.

image

ClinicMind promotes Kathleen Casbarro to SVP of its new Institutional Platform as a Service division.

image

Tomer Levy (Change Healthcare) joins Augmedix as SVP of engineering.


Announcements and Implementations

Children’s Hospital of Los Angeles implements Vital’s ERAdvisor software as a part of its MyVisit app.

MercyOne rolls out its TogetherTeam Virtual Connected Care virtual nursing program at all five of its hospitals in Iowa.

image

UC Davis Health (CA) launches a remote patient monitoring program for patients who’ve undergone Percutaneous Coronary Interventions using text messaging software from Twilio and RPM technology from Clinii.


Government and Politics

image

Air Force officials confirm that the switch to MHS Genesis has, as with the Navy and Army, lengthened the amount of time it takes to medically clear recruits due to an increase in initial, potentially disqualifying conditions that require further investigation. DoD representatives told Senate Armed Services Committee members last September that the switch to the Oracle Health-based system had added three more days to the recruitment process, though the Navy reported that up to 60 additional days were sometimes necessary.

image

An Idaho Department of Health official tells state legislators that the state should withdraw from the Idaho Health Data Exchange, given that it has no legal recourse for management oversight. The HIE, which currently has 190 customers, emerged from Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection last summer after running up $4 million in debt.

image

Tension escalates between the Southern Ute Indian Tribe, Indian Health Service, and Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment due to a technological glitch that has, for more than a year, prevented the Southern Ute Health Clinic from sending daily immunization data to the state registry via the IHS Resource and Patient Management System. None of the affected parties has been able to identify the problem, though the tribe has offered to cover the cost of a solution.


Privacy and Security

The Health Sector Cybersecurity Coordination Center within HHS alerts organizations to the tactics and targets of the relatively new Akira ransomware group.


Other

Australia’s Northern Territory Health temporarily suspends use of InterSystems TrakCare software at the emergency departments of Palmerston Regional and Royal Darwin hospitals, citing concerns that the software, dubbed Acacia, is slowing down access to patient records. Staffing shortages and other unspecified operational pressures also contributed to suspension of the system, which NT Health has been rolling out across its facilities since 2017.

Black Book Research survey respondents rank Surgical Information Systems as the top vendor for ambulatory surgical center software.

image

Through word of mouth and dedicated facilities teams, an NHS clinician in London reunites a fellow clinician working 100 miles away with a diamond ring she’d accidentally left in her scrubs five days prior.


Sponsor Updates

  • EClinicalWorks releases a new podcast, “Boosting Data Analysis in Healthcare.”
  • CereCore releases a new podcast, “Rolling Out EHRs in the Rural Setting: An Expert Guide.”
  • Availity adds automation and process mining capabilities from Janus to its Availity Essentials Pro software.
  • Arrive Health Senior Software Engineer Edward Kerns joins Code for Good West Michigan’s board as sponsorship coordinator.
  • Censinet releases a new Risk Never Sleeps Podcast, “Deepfakes, Identity, and Insider Threats, with Jason Elrod, Chief Information Security Officer at MultiCare Health System.”
  • Clearwater and 1stResponder partner to expand cybersecurity incident response within Clearwater’s Managed Security Service Provider portfolio.
  • New research from Linus Health determines that its Digital Clock and Recall assessment within its Core Cognitive Evaluation solution outperforms the most commonly used paper-based assessment in detecting early, mild cognitive impairment and dementia, and with less ethnic and racial bias.

Blog Posts


Contacts

Mr. H, Lorre, Jenn, Dr. Jayne.
Get HIStalk updates.
Send news or rumors.
Contact us.

Morning Headlines 2/13/24

February 12, 2024 Headlines No Comments

HHS Expands TEFCA by Adding Two Additional QHINs

ONC and The Sequoia Project designate Kno2 and CommonWell Health Alliance as Qualified Health Information Networks.

Air Force Confirms Medical Disqualifications Doubled after New Med-Records System Implemented

Air Force officials confirm that the switch to MHS Genesis has lengthened the amount of time it takes to medically clear recruits due to an increase in initial, potentially disqualifying conditions that require further investigation.

Headlight Launches With $18 Million in Funding and the Addition of Amazon Pharmacy Executives to Support Their Mission of Simplifying Patients’ Mental Health Journey

Hybrid mental health practice SokyaHealth rebrands to Headlight, announces $18 million in funding, and names former PillPack executive Geoff Swindle CEO.

Curbside Consult with Dr. Jayne 2/12/24

February 12, 2024 Dr. Jayne 2 Comments

Several of good friends from medical school hold significant physician leadership roles. I always enjoy catching up with them and hearing what is going on at their hospitals, as well as trading ideas for solving the different kinds of challenges our organizations are facing. Sometimes one of us has already been through an issue and there’s no sense in reinventing the proverbial wheel when you don’t have to.

Although my colleagues are knowledgeable about their own departments as well as those that they have to work with closely, they don’t always have the broad view of hospital operations that I have as an informatics leader. I think that when working with large enterprise EHR implementations, clinical informatics leaders are just conditioned to make sure that we are thinking about every part of the hospital as well as systems that aren’t even under our roofs, such as emergency medical services, transfer infrastructure, and more.

Regardless of region or state, everyone is facing hospital overcrowding. When there aren’t enough inpatient beds available, patients start backing up into the emergency department. The root cause of the inpatient bed shortage is multifactorial. Sometimes physical beds are lacking, and sometimes there are actual beds open but the shortage is one of staffed beds. There just aren’t enough personnel to keep a unit open.

Although many disciplines are in short supply, including respiratory therapy, the major issue I see in my region is still a nursing shortage. Hospitals in our area are still playing games with nurse compensation and have instituted staffing policies that negatively impact nurses and their families. Of my friends who are nurses, all have left hospital care except one, and I guarantee if she worked on a medical/surgical unit, she would leave, too.

Unless people are actually impacted by these shortages, they don’t tend to get engaged around the policy work that is needed to solve the problems. I was excited to see NBC News bring some of these issues to light this week, as it reported on the potential end of funding for Hospital at Home programs at the end of this year and how that end might worsen already tragic emergency department (ED) overcrowding.

CMS created the program, which is officially called Acute Hospital Care at Home, in 2020. The program allows hospitals to deliver high-acuity care to patients in their homes, where they receive visits from community paramedics and are connected via technologies such as video visits and home-based monitoring systems. The programs can help boost ED throughput by admitting patients back to their homes rather than potentially having to board them in the ED while they wait for a physical hospital bed.

Although more than 130 health systems have been approved to participate, it’s difficult to understand how many are truly bought in or what level of resources are being dedicated to program initiatives. Even if they are participating, hospitals may be left dangling at the end of the year unless Congress votes to extend funding for the program. Although some private payers are participating, CMS still provides the majority of funding for programs.

Even for those organizations that have embraced Hospital at Home programs, their impact is incremental. Atrium Health, for example, is treating 60 patients per day in its program in North Carolina and hopes to ramp that up to 100 patients per day by the end of 2024, which is a fraction of its total count of inpatients. If Hospital at Home programs are sunset, patients who might have been referred to them are instead going to need regular inpatient beds, which will further worsen the situation in systems where those programs had been successfully making a difference.

Policymakers need to look at other causes of ED overcrowding. In addition to the shortage of staffed beds on medical/surgical units, there are fewer beds available in nursing homes, psychiatric units, and rehabilitation facilities. Mental health services are in short supply everywhere, with families sometimes bringing loved ones to the emergency department because they feel they have nowhere else to turn. Telehealth solutions can help mitigate this to some degree, identifying patients who might qualify for outpatient management or who need help navigating the system, such as obtaining medication refills or finding a new provider for ongoing care. Progressive states are looking at the upstream causes of the mental health crisis and are allocating money to community programs, but other states seem to be just looking the other way.

The report also mentioned other pitfalls of our state-by-state patchwork of healthcare solutions. It looked at data from Massachusetts hospitals, including data on patients who are boarded in the emergency department while they wait for beds in the hospital. It profiled the venerable Massachusetts General Hospital, which has been boarding at least 45 patients at a time for more than a year, and in January of this year hit a count of 103 boarders with 220 people across the state in the same situation. The hospital considers this to be a “capacity disaster” and has asked the state to approve additional beds to help the situation.

They have also instituted a Hospital at Home program and have created a Discharge Lounge to help speed patient departures from the hospital building. Patients can wait there for their caregivers to pick them up, rather than remaining in a standard hospital room. That intervention helps 125 patients per month leave more than 60 minutes earlier, which will add up over time and as the program is expanded. The hospital is also providing transportation services to help patients leave when they don’t have reliable transportation.

Other solutions that can help make beds more available include virtual nursing care, where offsite nurses can work with patients and families to deliver patient education and discharge teaching, freeing up bedside nurses to deliver care that must be rendered by an in-person nurse. Virtual nursing programs in my community are keeping nurses that have been placed on light-duty restrictions active in patient care, rather than sidelining them. The technologies can also be used as a “phone-a-friend” solution for early career nurses to bring in a second set of nursing eyes to evaluate a particular patient. Having been a newly minted intern, I appreciate the idea of using technology to consult dedicated virtual resources rather than having to interrupt colleagues who are already knee-deep in patient care of their own.

The NBC News report goes on to note that Massachusetts is “unique” in the way that it keeps statistics on emergency department boarding, and that many states are lacking high-quality data on the problem. I know my own state doesn’t do a good job of tracking it, let alone communicating it, which means that citizens in our communities have no idea there’s as big of a problem as there actually is. The majority of my neighbors and friends in the community think that because COVID is “over” and there aren’t daily stories on the news about how bad things are at the hospitals, that everything is fine. That is, until a loved one sits for 17 hours in the waiting room before they see a physician. But it’s unclear if those experiences translate to actions, such as lobbying one’s legislators.

Demographics are shifting in the US, with increasing numbers of elderly patients and more of us who are living with chronic conditions. We are not spending enough money on preventive care, health promotion, or disease prevention, so the problem is likely to get worse before it gets better. Let’s hope that stories like this help to raise awareness and generate change so that we don’t continue in the downward spiral in which many of us feel trapped.

Does your organization support Hospital at Home activities, and how are they going? Leave a comment or email me.

Email Dr. Jayne.

Morning Headlines 2/12/24

February 11, 2024 Headlines No Comments

Staggering Rise in Medicare Bills Suggests Medicare Scam

The National Association of Accountable Care Organizations analyzes Medicare’s claims database to alert the federal government that 450,000 of its beneficiaries were billed for urinary catheters in 2023 versus the usual 50,000 in previous years, running up $2 billion in suspicious charges.

Virgin Pulse and HealthComp Introduce Combined Company as Personify Health

Virgin Pulse and HealthComp, which merged in November 2023, name the $3 billion business Personify Health.

AI cannot be used to deny health care coverage, feds clarify to insurers

CMS tells Medicare Advantage insurers that they can use AI and algorithms to assist them in making coverage determinations, but they must make sure that the tools use complete information and they can’t use technology alone to deny hospital admission or downgrade to observation stay.

Monday Morning Update 2/12/24

February 11, 2024 News 9 Comments

Top News

image

The National Association of Accountable Care Organizations analyzes Medicare’s claims database to alert the federal government that 450,000 of its beneficiaries were billed for urinary catheters in 2023 versus the usual 50,000 in previous years, running up  $2 billion in suspicious charges.

Pretty in Pink Boutique — whose Medicare registration is for a house address in El Paso, TX and whose phone rings to an auto body shop — billed Medicare for at least $267 million in just over a year for catheters.

Patients and doctors who reported suspicious activity to CMS say they never got a response. Dozens of NYT commenters said the same, that the CMS person either expressed resignation with the status quo or lack of motivation to add to their workload.


Reader Comments

From Jerry Aldini: “Re: Oracle Health. Interesting comments on the Cerner Reddit.” Examples, all unverified:

  • “Oracle thought Cerner was worth buying for Larry’s little healthcare data hobby, but once everything is converted to OCI, nobody would ever want to buy what Cerner was ever again. So when Larry is no more or gets bored, it’s the end of the story.”
  • [On the company’s pledge to rewrite Millennium using AI] From everyone I’ve talked with, it is vaporware, and even then demos went to crap pretty quickly. I’m just riding this out until all clients abandon ship.”
  • “Maybe Congress would like to know more about Larry’s new wonderful AI software engineer and how it means that they can maintain a multi-billion-dollar system for America’s service people and veterans with nothing even remotely resembling what would be considered a normal software engineering company. Like, why bury the lede, Larry? You’ve successfully removed the need for high-cost, hard-to-find employees to maintain software. This is a coup for the entire tech industry. Forget the EMR, let’s hear about the AI, that’s where the money is.”

HIStalk Announcements and Requests

image

Most poll respondents think that the former Cerner business has become less competitive since Oracle acquired it.

New poll to your right or here: Do you own shares or equity in a health IT-related company? You can use the poll’s comment function to describe times when you made or lost big money from a health IT investment.

Help me out by signing up for spam-free updates and connecting on LinkedIn.

I am an India-phile, fascinated with the culture, food, and business and technology advances of the world’s largest democracy. I also enjoy regional English usage. I collected these examples from HIStalk-related emails with people from India that featured words and terms that are accurate, just not commonly used here:

  • Prepone – the opposite of postpone, to describe moving an event earlier.
  • Revert back – not a redundant expression, but rather to ask for a reply, as in “kindly revert back.”
  • Cent percent – 100%.
  • Full stop – Indians were using this term long before trendy Americans embraced it in referring to the period at the end of a sentence, or to some, the more emphatic break at the end of a paragraph that signals a new train of thought.
  • Mention not – this is a great alternative to the wishy washy “you’re welcome.” I might start using this with hopes of displacing the dreaded “no problem,” although saying “mention not” after the person has already “mentioned” doesn’t quite fit.

image

Welcome to new HIStalk Platinum Sponsor TruBridge. The Mobile, AL-based company connects providers, patients, and communities with innovative solutions to support financial and clinical solutions, creating real value in healthcare delivery. By offering technology-first solutions that address diverse communities’ needs, it promotes equitable access to quality care and foster positive outcomes. Its industry-leading HFMA Peer Reviewed RCM suite provides visibility that enhances productivity and supports the financial health of organizations across care settings. It champions end-to-end, data-driven patient journeys that support value-based care and improve outcomes and patient satisfaction. It supports efficient patient care with EHR products that integrate data between care settings. TruBridge clears the way for care. Thanks to TruBridge for supporting HIStalk.


Webinars

None scheduled soon. Previous webinars are on our YouTube channel. Contact Lorre to present or promote your own.


Acquisitions, Funding, Business, and Stock

image

Omnicell announces Q4 results: revenue down 13%, EPS –$0.32 versus –$0.64, beating Wall Street expectations for both. OMCL shares have lost 49% in the past 12 months versus the S&P 500’s 26% gain, valuing the company at $1.4 billion. The CFO said in the earnings call that customers are cautious about implementing new workflows because of IT and nursing staff shortages, while the CEO said that big health systems aren’t ready to implement innovation until they develop strategies for dispensing medication across their broad footprints.

image

Virgin Pulse and HealthComp, which merged in November 2023, name the $3 billion business Personify Health.

Marathon Health, which bought Cerner’s employer occupational health clinics in August 2023, acquires Everside Health, expanding its services to 680 health centers in 41 states.

image

Aptar Digital Health, a division of Aptar Pharma, will take over the digital health solutions of Biogen, which address neurological and rare diseases.


Sales

  • England’s Torbay and South Devon NHS Foundation Trusts chooses Epic.

People

image

University of Tennessee Medical Center names Lynnette Clinton, MBA (BayCare) as SVP/CIO.


Announcements and Implementations

image

Amenities Health launches plug-and-play provider search and scheduling for a health system’s public-facing website, extending its mobile app experience.

AdventHealth brings the last five of its 48 hospitals live on Epic, completing its conversion from Cerner. AdventHealth announced that it would implement Epic in early 2020, displacing the Cerner system that it had installed in 2002.

image

Sparked, Australia’s national FHIR accelerator, opens the draft of its Australian Core Data for Interoperability Release 1 for comments.


Government and Politics

CMS tells Medicare Advantage insurers that they can use AI and algorithms to assist them in making coverage determinations, but they must make sure that the tools use complete information and they can’t use technology alone to deny hospital admission or downgrade to observation stay. CMS also warns that MA insurers should make sure that their systems are free of bias.

A North Carolina health news site observes that Atrium Health wields its status as a “unit of local government” to get tax breaks, the power of eminent domain, and anti-trust immunity that allowed it to acquire 40 hospitals in four states, after which it merged with Advocate Aurora Health to form the country’s third-largest non-profit health system with $27 billion in revenue.


Other

In India, a review finds that 11 of 40 of Bangalore tele-ICUs in rural “spoke hospitals” are not functional due to lack of Internet connectivity, lost software copies, and clinician shortages.

image

Medical malpractice physician Jeff Willis, MD, MHA notes that 28 states give full practice authority to nurse practitioners and another 10 are considering it. He says that while the NP lobby was smart to take advantage of the primary care crisis to expand practice, he ponders that it’s a broken healthcare system that created the need and that it raises malpractice issues. A commenter says that several states also allow advanced practice chiropractors to do physician-like work, while another says that NPs are important in rural areas because doctors won’t work there given low volumes that drive RVU-based compensation. A physician commenter says that the rural idea sounds nice, except a lot of the NPs chase the money that comes from running IV bars, Botox shops, and med spas in urban areas.


Sponsor Updates

  • Kellum Medical Group (TX) leverages the Sunoh.ai AI medical scribe as part of its EClinicalWorks EHR implementation.
  • Amenities adds online patient scheduling to its Digital Front Door Platform.
  • Availity achieves the CAQH Committee on Operating Rules for Information Exchange (CORE) Eligibility & Benefits, Claim Status, Payment & Remittance, Prior Authorization & Referrals, and Health Care Claims Operating Certification seals.
  • Health Data Movers joins CHIME as a member.
  • QGenda and Spok will exhibit at the AHA Rural Health Care Leadership Conference February 11-14 in Orlando.
  • Waystar will exhibit at Nymbl.Con 2024 February 14-16 in Scottsdale, AZ.

Blog Posts


Contacts

Mr. H, Lorre, Jenn, Dr. Jayne.
Get HIStalk updates.
Send news or rumors.
Contact us.

HIStalk Interviews Russ Richmond, MD, CEO, Laudio

February 9, 2024 Interviews No Comments

Russ Richmond, MD is co-founder and CEO of Laudio of Boston, MA.

image

Tell me about yourself and the company.

I’m a lifelong entrepreneur. I’m also a physician, and through that and other activities, I’ve walked the halls of over 100 hospitals and I understand how they run. I have focused my life on building solutions software for hospitals.

I’m the founder and CEO of Laudio, which is an AI-enhanced platform for the frontline leaders or frontline managers in health systems. We support these frontline leaders with workflow that saves them time and drives improved employee retention and engagement, operational efficiency, and improved patient experience.

How much health system employee burnout and turnover can be tied to manager-level behavior rather than organization-wide policies like compensation?

Our best guess is that 60% to 70% of the employee’s engagement, which is the proximal metric for turnover, is influenced or driven by their direct reporting relationship with their manager. Health systems assume that it is always compensation related. I’m not saying that compensation isn’t a very important thing, but we know that frontline workers attach much more to their managers than they do to the overall organization. We know that by improving the bond between a frontline worker and their manager, we can greatly influence their propensity to stay engaged and employed at that organization.

People often say that they love the company, but can’t stand the boss.

People don’t quit jobs, they quit managers. Managers have a tremendous amount of influence on the mental wellbeing of their employees, and anyone who has had a bad boss knows that well.

But what we have learned inside health systems is that they have a special issue, which is that the frontline managers have very large spans of control. It’s not uncommon to see team sizes of 50, 70, or 100 direct reports into a manager. That really stretches the bandwidth of that manager to do traditional management.

The biggest lever is to increase the frequency of timely, relevant connections between the managers and their teams in a way that feels personalized, in a way that makes a big team feel smaller. That in and of itself can drive a tremendous improvement in engagement and retention. If a manager takes the time to have a one-on-one interaction with their team member every month, the likelihood of that team member quitting falls by over 40%. It’s just that the managers sometimes don’t have time to do that.

Beyond that, it’s the intuitive things, and a few counterintuitive things, that make a difference. First, managers showing that they care about the wellbeing of their employee when they do interact with them. How is their schedule? Have they worked too many shifts in a row? Are they forming relationships on the unit and inside their teams? Celebrating or recognizing good work done? These are the types of actions that managers can take that can make a real difference. 

Then somewhat counterintuitively, even when managers interact with team members on accountability-related issues — like corrective action with a worker who is always coming in late — that actually drives an increase in retention. Because all of a sudden, the frontline worker knows that someone is paying attention to them, that someone cares about whether they are there on time.

It can be a wide array of interactions, but the key is that they have to happen, happen regularly, and happen in a way that’s not a bulk email, not pro forma, but in a caring, personalized way.

What is the disconnect between what executives expect and what managers do?

Many executives don’t appreciate the challenge these frontline managers are up against. Huge spans of control, extending to the number of systems that they need to interact with and operate, the administrative burden that they face, and just getting their regular work done in terms of documentation, getting data into the right place, and setting the schedule. Because they are disconnected from that everyday reality, it’s harder for them to support and coach these frontline leaders. It’s harder for them to connect their agenda, which may be system-wide performance improvement, with the everyday actions of the frontline leader.

Laudio solves for that. It connects the overall system wide agenda — say, improving retention of full -time employees, reducing contract labor, or improving HCAHPS scores — with specific daily actions that frontline managers can take that and that fit into their workflow in an efficient way. That’s where we have focused our efforts on solving that problem.

How does a health system define its goals and then package up individual tasks that frontline managers should be doing?

We have live API integrations into the systems around these managers. That includes the HR information systems, like Oracle or Workday. That includes the time and attendance systems, like UKG. That even includes Epic, where we get patient geolocation information. The data aggregation is handled through our platform. 

Once we have the data in one place, it’s just a matter of working with the senior leaders in the health system around their priorities. Some of them have priorities, especially in today’s day and age, around reducing turnover or reducing incremental overtime. In that case, we are pushing those types of actions through Laudio. Some of them have priorities in saving their frontline leaders time, because they can see that they are overburdened. In that case, we are working with the frontline leaders on automating their work and creating more operational efficiency. Some of them have priorities in patient experience or quality, and in those cases, we are emphasizing those workflows.

Because we are a platform that surrounds the frontline leader, it’s just a matter of, from an organizational level, determining what to emphasize first and foremost. Then once we are seeing good results there, we can move on to the next area.

I’m still thinking about a hospital manager having 100 direct reports covering a 24-hour schedule. Is healthcare unusual in that regard?

Yes, it is unusual. I have not seen another industry like it. Normal executive span of control is between six to maybe 12 people. Even when you get to 20 people, which is a low span of control inside an acute care facility, you are way beyond that. 

I think it comes from the guild-based practice of medicine, where practitioners were meant to be individual contributors in an era that wasn’t as team-based and wasn’t as technically challenged. We live with it today, and it has become a more or less a permanent part of the economics of health systems. They have a hard time affording span-breakers and hiring more managers, because most health systems are working to reduce their labor expenses. It becomes what can we do for our managers to give them more capacity to take on these larger team sizes and to still drive the results that we need in the system.

I would assume that a lot of those folks were promoted into management because of their own job performance among peers rather than having managerial aspirations or talents.

That’s correct. Managers in health systems are almost never hired horizontally from other organizations outside of healthcare, and very rarely are they hired horizontally inside a facility or organization. What you see almost all the time is individual frontline workers getting promoted into being a frontline manager when their manager leaves, which we call a battlefield promotion.

In the context of a battlefield promotion, it’s difficult to ensure that that new manager has acquired all of the management best practices, skills, and training that will be needed to be good at that job. It’s a very different job than the one they had been doing. This is where we believe that software can at least be part of the solution, and that we can hardwire a lot of the management best practices through our system and also introduce best practices as they are discovered so that they can become immediately diffused to the managers versus waiting for them to go to get a master’s in healthcare administration or to take some type of a training program that that health system may offer.

Software has a tremendous advantage in supporting especially new managers, but all managers, to quickly acquire some of the skills they need to do a great job.

Do managers get adequate employee feedback from hallway conversations, or is a formal feedback mechanism required?

It is very difficult for a manager in a hospital to get accurate feedback, because they are managing a unit that is working 24×7 while working 40 or 50 hours of the week. They are not regularly interfacing with the entire employee base. When they are, it’s often in the context of putting out a fire. I put that in quotes, such as handling on a patient issue, a physician complaint, or a near-term operational priority like a staffing gap. 

Employee voice tools effectively gather feedback regularly and efficiently. They help managers understand their unit better by highlighting only the key issues that require action. This saves time and enables quick responses to important matters. It’s a great use of technology.

What are early warning indicators for burnout that an overburdened manager can detect so they can at least take action to retain an employee?

Health systems are collecting a lot of employee-specific data continuously all the time. The problem is sorting the signal from the noise, figuring out what is relevant, and then in the context of a busy unit, finding the right way to connect on it. 

Our software helps prioritize and identify the individuals who need the manager’s attention most, using AI and risk models. Then we connect the manager to the evidence-based best next action with that frontline employee. That can vary dramatically, depending on the core issue. It could be helping them iron out their schedule if they have an unusual working pattern where they are always on weekends or something undesirable. It could include helping them think about their promotional pathway and clinical ladder to give them a longer-term view in the system. It could be reviewing complimentary feedback from their patients and recognizing them for a job well done. It really depends on the situation and the individual worker. 

Where Laudio has a real advantage is that since we are collecting all this information, we are understanding what the managers are doing with it and the actions that we are taking. We have created an evidence-based dataset of which actions can support the workers the most. We publish a new use of evidence every week in a part of our website called Laudio Insights, where in a non-commercial way, we are trying to promote the practice of what we call evidence-based leadership. Everyone can benefit from what we are learning around what makes the most difference for managers and how they can use this evidence to practice differently.

What are your company priorities over the next few years?

Continuing to focus on helping create management actions that will drive new levels of impact in health systems. We can handle the data aggregation and analysis that is done automatically in our machine. We are starting to turn our frontline managers into super-powered frontline managers and make them more efficient.

In the future, we want to continue to pull new and different data sources into our system to help them to achieve new horizons of impact. This could include things like the supplies that are used inside each unit. It could include all of the sensors that are in patient rooms around handwashing or whether the patients are being rotated on their beds. We see a future where more and more of this data and information is integrated into a single source of recommendation for the manager so that they can make the impact happen without having the analysis, risk modeling, and data aggregation get in the way.

Morning Headlines 2/9/24

February 8, 2024 Headlines No Comments

Unlearn Raises $50 Million Series C to Optimize Clinical Research With AI-Powered Digital Twin Technology

Unlearn, which creates digital twins that allow smaller and faster clinical trials, raises $50 million in a Series C funding round.

Lurie Children’s Hospital says a ‘criminal threat’ forced the shutdown of its network

Initially deemed a network outage, Lurie Children’s Hospital confirms that the January 31 cybersecurity incident that forced it to take its communications network offline was caused by a criminal threat actor.

Official: Idaho should consider withdrawing from Health Data Exchange

An Idaho Department of Health official tells state legislators that the state should withdraw from the bankrupt Idaho Health Data Exchange, given that it has no legal recourse for oversight.

HHS Finalizes New Provisions to Enhance Integrated Care and Confidentiality for Patients with Substance Use Conditions

HHS announces new provisions to the Confidentiality of Substance Use Disorder Patient Records that address one-time patient consent, redisclosure, accounting of disclosures, use of records in legal proceedings, and breach notification.

Text Ads


RECENT COMMENTS

  1. Honestly, I autocorrected "62 Ventures" as "62 Vultures", and I considered posting snark about same! Is that on me? Is…

  2. $20 million to improve behavioral HIT? That's like 1/7th of a typical Epic install in one hospital. Seems like symbolic…

  3. Regarding the Particle Health - Epic Carequality Drama - it's important to note that most existing national networks separate out…

  4. Re: Tullman/62 Ventures Given his track record for acquiring companies, bungling day-to-day operations and then somehow selling to an unwitting…

  5. Was not the struggle of Teladoc foreseeable with the acquisition of Livongo?

Founding Sponsors


 

Platinum Sponsors


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Gold Sponsors


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

RSS Webinars

  • An error has occurred, which probably means the feed is down. Try again later.