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News 6/10/22

June 9, 2022 News 4 Comments

Top News

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CMS issues the first civil money penalties against hospitals that failed to comply with federal price transparency laws.

Northside Hospital Atlanta will pay $883,000, while Northside Hospital Cherokee will pay $214,000.

CMS says that Northside Hospital Atlanta ignored its warning notice and argued that the best way for patients to obtain pricing information is to use its Price Estimate telephone line.

Northside Hospital Cherokee also ignored CMS’s warning and also intentionally removed previously posted pricing files from its website.


HIStalk Announcements and Requests

I’ve been miserably ill for five days with COVID symptoms that may not actually be COVID since antigen tests and PCR were negative. I have extreme fatigue, a temperature and cough, muscle weakness, reduced visual acuity, and brain fog. I’m sure I’ve made mistakes, so bear with me.


Webinars

None scheduled soon. Previous webinars are on our YouTube channel. Contact Lorre to present your own.


Acquisitions, Funding, Business, and Stock

The acquisition of Nordic Consulting Partners by Accrete Health Partners reportedly cost $400 million.

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Providence-owned Tegria combines six of its legacy companies to form Advata, which will focus on improving patient outcomes using advanced analytics.


People

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Amwell hires Carrie Nelson, MD, MS (Advocate Aurora Health) as chief medical officer.

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Surescripts names Frank Harvey, MBA (ATLS Investments) as CEO.

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Julie Haluska, MPA (AllianceOne) joins HealthRecon Connect as VP of enterprise sales.


Sponsor Updates

  • PatientBond publishes a new case study, “Improving Patient Satisfaction Rates for Specialty Pharmacy.”
  • Pivot Point Consulting promotes Matt Curtin to managing director, enterprise client solutions.
  • Symplr embeds Visier’s people analytics capabilities in its recruiting solution to support deeper insights into people management and decision-making.
  • Nordic publishes a video titled “Considerations for successful EHR extensions.”
  • Quil Health CEO Carina Edwards will keynote at the virtual Connected Health Summit June 16.

Blog Posts


Contacts

Mr. H, Lorre, Jenn, Dr. Jayne.
Get HIStalk updates.
Send news or rumors.
Contact us.

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EPtalk by Dr. Jayne 6/9/22

June 9, 2022 Dr. Jayne No Comments

Since there have been so many dramatic changes to many workplaces over the last two years, many companies are re-evaluating the meaning of the workweek. I always keep my eye out for articles on this topic, as well as literature from other countries where work-life balance seems to be much higher priority than it is in the US. There have been several writeups this week about a move in the United Kingdom for large numbers of workers to adopt a four-day work week. There are 3.000 workers taking part in a six-month project to assess whether shortening the work week will alter productivity, employee turnover, company revenue, and more.

The article mentions strategies different companies have taken in trying to alter the work week, including streamlining meetings and reducing inefficiencies. Kickstarter, which is small at only 90 employees, has given them Fridays off. I know of quite a few larger companies that don’t necessarily give people Friday off, but instead offer “Focus Fridays” and other themes where employees are supposed to have uninterrupted work time without meetings or distractions. For employees who are self-motivated, this can be a solid strategy. One of the health systems I worked for pre-pandemic allowed employees to work remotely one day each week and I have to say it was some of the most productive time I had, because in the pre-Zoom era, there weren’t any meetings or calls.

Another strategy that I see some companies offering as a means to improve work-life balance is that of unlimited time off. In speaking with friends that work at a large tech company where this is the norm, it can be less of a benefit than advertised, since workers who aren’t accustomed to tracking time off may not take full advantage of the paid time off that they might have received under a more traditional system. Although when these programs were initially rolled out, there was a lot of concern about people abusing it, many companies find that workers actually spend less time away from the office. I’ve worked with plenty of people over the years who only took days off when they were “forced” to in order to get the days off the books.

Other groups are offering dedicated days where employees are supposed to focus on self-care. Advocate Aurora Health is one of those, offering “renewal days” where employees are supposed to meet together for support. I found it interesting that their original program was a three-day workshop designed to focus on finding meaning in work while building skills to combat burnout, stress, and compassion fatigue but it has since been compressed into a single-day program. That seems such a parallel to everything that has happened since January 2020, where most healthcare workers are expected to do more with less even in the face of previously unheard-of stressors. I still hear about plenty of healthcare organizations that are trying to combat serious organizational issues through the application of pizza lunches and therapy dogs so I’m not sure we’re making much progress.

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The University of Missouri launches a telehealth program to train rural primary care physicians in the use of Canvas Dx with the goal of supporting autism diagnoses. The tool, from Cognoa, will be added to the platform used by the University of Missouri ECHO Autism Communities Research Team. The group will explore the time it takes from a physician’s initial concern that Autism may be a factor to a diagnostic determination via Canvas Dx. Earlier diagnoses should lead to earlier interventions and hopefully better outcomes for patients and families. The study plans to recruit up to 15 clinicians to evaluate as many as 100 children at risk for autism spectrum disorder or developmental delay. As a side note: has anyone ever noticed that the MU logo contains a mule? I don’t know how many times I’ve seen the logo but never the mule.

US Representatives Madeleine Dean (Pennsylvania) and Larry Bucshon (Indiana) introduced a bill this week that aims to protect healthcare workers from violence. It is modeled after existing protections created for airline and airport workers. The Safety from Violence for Healthcare Employees (SAVE) Act would make assault or intimidation of hospital employees a crime. Representative Bucshon is a physician, so I’m disappointed that the bill appears to focus on hospital workers and not on the tens of thousands of healthcare workers in other locations where they might be even more vulnerable, including ambulatory offices and home care. Workers in those locations don’t have anywhere near the level of security or assistance found in the average hospital. As a healthcare worker who was left out of vaccine allocations because I didn’t work for a hospital (despite delivering a high volume of COVID care) it looks like we haven’t learned and will continue to propose short-sighted policies.

One of my healthcare providers recently notified me of a data breach that may have exposed my personal health information. According to the documentation, the organization learned that an “unauthorized person” gained access to a subset of employee email accounts over a more than three-week period. Investigators were not able to determine whether emails or attachments were actually viewed, but the emails included data on both patients and research subjects including names, birth dates, addresses, medical records, insurance information, Social Security numbers, and more. It’s not clear now many patients have been impacted but they promise to reinforce training on avoiding suspicious emails and to make enhancements to email security, so it seems obvious to me how the breach occurred. Depending on what data might have been exposed, some patients will receive credit monitoring and identity protection services. Regardless, it’s going to be unnerving for many of us for a long time to come. At this point I get a breach notification every year or two, so it seems there is a lot of opportunity for improvement among the various members of my healthcare team.

Judging from my social media feeds, many people are taking advantage of what they perceive to be a “normal” travel season. I’ve seen plenty of pictures from amazing places, but my own summer will be a little low key this year. I’m juggling some big projects and a go live, so I’ll only be occasionally off the grid. It just gives me more time though to plan the next big adventure.

What are your summer travel plans, or are you going the staycation route? Leave a comment or email me.

Email Dr. Jayne.

Morning Headlines 6/9/22

June 8, 2022 Headlines No Comments

Bon Secours bags Nordic Consulting Partners in $400M-plus deal

Sources report that Accrete Health Partners’ acquisition of Nordic Consulting, first announced last week, is valued at just over $400 million.

Arnot Health says technical issues resolved

Arnot Health (NY) resolves computer hardware issues that first surfaced in early May, leading to weeks of outages.

Data breach at health care organization may affect 2 million

Imaging and ambulatory surgical services provider Shields Health Care Group reports a March data breach that may impact 2 million patients.

Morning Headlines 6/8/22

June 7, 2022 Headlines No Comments

Oracle Completes Acquisition of Cerner

Oracle has closed its deal to acquire Cerner for $28 billion.

Introducing Advata, a Software Company Improving Patient Outcomes Through Advanced Analytics

Providence-backed Advata launches as an RCM analytics and clinical decision support software company leveraging integrated solutions from KenSci, Colburn Hill Group, Alphalytics, Lumedic, Quiviq, and MultiScale.

Virtual addiction startup Bicycle Health rides Series B to $83M

Virtual opioid use disorder treatment provider Bicycle Health raises $50 million in a Series B funding round, bringing its total raised to $83 million.

News 6/8/22

June 7, 2022 Headlines No Comments

Top News

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Oracle shares see a slight uptick on the news that the company has closed its deal to acquire Cerner for $28 billion.


Webinars

None scheduled soon. Previous webinars are on our YouTube channel. Contact Lorre to present your own.


Acquisitions, Funding, Business, and Stock

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Bain Capital has acquired a majority stake in LeanTaaS, a technology vendor specializing in hospital operations and capacity management optimization. The company, founded by CEO Mohan Giridharadas in 2010, has raised nearly $238 million. Its cloud-based software is used by over 500 hospitals and 130 health systems.


People

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Lyniate promotes Scott Galbari to president, COO, and CISO; and hires Mikael Andén (Intelerad Medical Systems) as EVP of sales.

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Surescripts names Frank Harvey (ATLS Investments) CEO. Harvey succeeds Tom Skelton, who announced his intent to retire late last year.

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Mark Costanza (Spok) joins MobileSmith as chief client and operations officer.


Announcements and Implementations

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Stanford Health Care (CA) implements interactive bedside patient entertainment and hospital services technology from Sonifi Health.

Great Falls Clinic (MT) has implemented Phreesia’s patient intake technology.

LeadingReach announces GA of care coordination analytics.

Medical Center Health System (TX) rolls out a patient portal app incorporating EHR technology from Cerner and video visit capabilities from Amwell.


Government and Politics

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After more than a year of training, Martin Army Community Hospital at Fort Benning in Georgia will go live on MHS Genesis this weekend.

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A new report from the Australian Digital Health Agency finds that routine patient visit information is still missing from many health records within the national My Health Record system, launched in 2012 with a price tag of over $1.4 billion. Patient use has also been wanting, with just 2.69 million out of the nation’s 23 million patients accessing their information since the system’s launch. Physicians have found the software’s design to be problematic, with many preferring to instead access patient data via their hospital’s EHR.

Plans to implement a Cerner-based EHR across facilities on Prince Edward Island have come to a halt due to usability issues. The province had hoped to have all sites live by 2020. Forty-three clinics and 118 physicians have been connected to the system, with 100 more clinicians still to go. The same software has been in use at Island Health hospitals for over a decade. Two independent reviews of that $178 million implementation have been conducted based on physician complaints of poor usability and patient safety risks.

The State of Wisconsin eliminates EHR integration fees to encourage more providers to connect to its electronic prescription drug monitoring program.


Other

The latest release of the Philips Capsule Surveillance solution has received 510(k) market clearance from the FDA.

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UT Southwestern Medical Center researchers have found that access to telemedicine visits and continuous glucose monitoring during the pandemic helped diabetic pediatric patients control their glucose levels and stay out of the hospital at rates similar to pre-pandemic levels.

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Apple adds medication list creation, reminders, and critical interaction alert features in its latest iOS update.

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A small study conducted at a stroke clinic within the UC San Diego Health system has found that patient satisfaction with telemedicine visits improved when patients were texted a log-in link when the physician was ready for the appointment, rather than queuing in a virtual waiting room. Over half of patients were seen early during the two and a half month study, while zero were seen late, resulting in time savings of nearly an hour. As a result, the health system is rolling out the text messaging option to high-volume primary care and surgical care clinics this summer. The text-to-video technology was developed by Doximity.


Sponsor Updates

  • AGS Health will exhibit at CHIACON22 Convention & Exhibit June 12-15 in Riverside, CA.
  • Baker Tilly publishes a new case study, “Product value communication results in new payer coverage for diagnostic testing coverage.”
  • Cerner publishes a new client achievement story, “Clinicians at pediatric health system save charting time following ambulatory optimization.”
  • CHIME releases a new CHIMEcast Podcast, “Challenge, Change, and Resilience with Michael Jefferies.”
  • Clearwater names Mike Scheerhorn (Everly Health) to its compliance and privacy consulting team.
  • Current Health has been named the 2022 Frost & Sullivan Company of the Year in the global virtual home care platform industry.
  • CarePort adds predictive analytics for post-acute care planning after discharge to its CareManagement and Insight solutions.
  • Patient privacy monitoring company Protenus updates its website.
  • OptimizeRx completes integration of TelaRep’s one-click prescriber connectivity solution with its Therapy Initiation and Persistence Platform.
  • Diameter Health partners with Smile CDR, giving customers the ability to implement Diameter Health’s Fusion technology for upcycling data along with Smile CDR’s clinical data repository capabilities.

Blog Posts


Contacts

Mr. H, Lorre, Jenn, Dr. Jayne.
Get HIStalk updates.
Send news or rumors.
Contact us.

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Morning Headlines 6/7/22

June 6, 2022 Headlines No Comments

Aledade Raises $123 Million Series E to Accelerate Growth in Medicare Advantage and Support Primary Care Physicians With Expanded Services

Tech-enabled practice management company Aledade secures $123 million in Series E funding, bringing its total raised to nearly $420 million.

LeanTaaS Announces Growth Investment by Bain Capital Private Equity to Fuel Leading AI-Driven Platform for Hospitals to Achieve Operational Excellence

Bain Capital has acquired a majority stake in LeanTaaS, a software vendor specializing in hospital operations and capacity management optimization.

Minneapolis women’s telehealth clinic Visana Health raises $2.6 million

Virtual women’s healthcare company Visana Health raises $2.6 million in a seed funding round.

Curbside Consult with Dr. Jayne 6/6/22

June 6, 2022 Dr. Jayne 3 Comments

It’s been a long week, and I’ve spent a good bit of it trying to process the recent episodes of violence against healthcare workers in Tulsa and Los Angeles. The Tulsa incident had a particular impact on me since I did some EHR optimization work for Warren Clinic in the past. As the news reports unfolded, and before we knew exactly where the shooting occurred, I wondered if any of the staff that I worked closely with had been impacted. Although it turned out that I hadn’t worked with any of the victims, it was still devastating to learn of the loss of dedicated healthcare professionals who had given so much to their patients and who still had many more years of service ahead of them.

Hearing of the stabbing in Los Angeles later in the week was almost too much to bear. Those who see patients in person go to work every day knowing that it’s going to be difficult, but generally they don’t expect to be shot or stabbed on the job. I’ve worked in plenty of “tough” clinical locations. At one hospital emergency department, I had to park in a secure garage that was lined with chain link fence, essentially creating a cage. You had to have a badge to get in or out via car and accessed the hospital through a secure elevator that either took you directly into the ED or up to the ICU waiting room. I often wondered what would happen if the power went out, but fortunately it never did during the years I worked there.

Patients and visitors to that facility had to go through metal detectors. I had a security guard posted at my clinical workstation in the event things became contentious. Sometimes my patients were handcuffed to their gurneys since they were being evaluated to ensure they were “fit for confinement” after being arrested by local law enforcement.

Additionally, the emergency department exam rooms all had two doors on different sides of the room so that there was always a way for you to get out. I’ve worked in large urban trauma centers, locked psychiatric emergency units, and critical access hospitals where all kinds of unusual cases have come through the doors. I’ve had patients become agitated and aggressive before, and I was even stalked by a patient, but even in those circumstances I never actually imagined that I was at risk of being shot, stabbed, or killed while trying to help patients.

Violence against healthcare workers is at an all-time high. It’s not just physical violence or homicide, but more often includes verbal abuse and threats. The Bureau of Labor Statistics indicates that healthcare and social assistance workers have the highest rates of injuries due to workplace violence. In fact, workers in those industries are five times more likely to be injured at work than workers overall. Incidents of workplace violence have been rising nearly every year since they were tracked, beginning in 2011. Although the Occupational Safety and Health Administration has guidance for employers, there are no federal requirements for healthcare organizations to protect their employees from workplace violence.

Some states have addressed the issue. A Wisconsin law makes battery against certain healthcare workers a felony. There has been some action at the federal level, but nowhere near enough. Personally, I’d like to see healthcare organizations have to report their statistics just like college campuses do – collecting detailed information about violent incidents and reporting their numbers annually. At my last in-person physician gig, my employer had numerous episodes of workplace violence and no clear mitigation strategy. Incidents were hushed up and employees were discouraged from discussing them for fear that staff wouldn’t want to pick up shifts at certain locations. There certainly wasn’t any kind of post-event debriefing for those impacted by violent incidents. Everyone was just expected to pick up and carry on, which is exactly the opposite of what is needed.

Those incidents seemed to escalate during the initial phases of the pandemic, when everyone was scared and uncertain. They became worse as certain unapproved treatments were pushed on social media, and patients would become aggressive when told we would not prescribe ivermectin or other drugs that had been shown to not only have no benefit but to have significant risks. Patients argued with us about their diagnoses despite having positive lab results and told us directly to our faces that we didn’t know what we were talking about and that we were either lying or part of a vast conspiracy. One of the worst things I had to deal with during the pandemic was patients who refused to wear a mask in the exam room, or who would take it off as soon as I walked out the door, to fill the room with their exhaled breathing so I could walk back into a cloud of virus. To have to deal with that hour after hour, day after day, and to not be able to confront it for fear of lowering patient satisfaction scores was one of the things that contributed to my departure.

Still, I’m here, and although no one has tried to directly kill me at work, it’s certainly on my mind that what happened last week could have happened to any one of us at any time. Along with many of my colleagues, we’re feeling a certain level of survivor’s guilt after seeing so much loss in the healthcare community over the last few years. Although we’ve gotten better at protecting ourselves from disease, the steps that we need to be taking to protect ourselves from workplace violence are less than clear. Regardless, healthcare employers owe it to their teams to assess the safety and the workplace and the wellbeing of those in it. Every healthcare organization should be offering employee assistance programs to those who are struggling with the recent tragedies and increasing violence.

Readers may be asking themselves what all this has to do with healthcare IT. If you’re a frontline IT support person who works in clinical areas, the answer to that is clear. It’s also a heads-up about what the people you’re trying to support might be going through. If they seem on edge or preoccupied, there’s a good chance that they are one of both of those. I’m sure that if I were seeing patients in person, I’d be less interested in learning about new features or workflows that are about to be deployed than I would be in learning how the hospital plans to keep me safe. Even if you’re not working in a clinical area, you’re not immune to workplace violence. All of us should be standing together to demand solutions that ensure we all make it home to our families at the end of the workday.

Email Dr. Jayne.

Morning Headlines 6/6/22

June 5, 2022 Headlines No Comments

Software glitch at hospitals caused patients to receive inaccurate test results

In Israel, at least five hospitals report that physicians have been sent inaccurate lab test results due to a software problem.

DeliverHealth Opens Its New Headquarters And Experience Center In Clearwater, Florida

DeliverHeatlh, which specializes in healthcare documentation, coding, and revenue integrity software and services, relocates its Madison, WI headquarters to Clearwater, FL and opens a customer experience center in the same facility.

Leading Healthcare Artificial Intelligence Company Raises $20m Series A Extension

Sleep data interpretation and analysis software vendor EnsoData adds $20 million to its Series A funding round, bringing the round’s total to $29 million.

Meriplex Acquires Healthcare-based MSP, LightPoint

Managed IT and cybersecurity firm Meriplex acquires LightPoint, a managed services provider with a niche in healthcare IT.

Monday Morning Update 6/6/22

June 5, 2022 News 1 Comment

Top News

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Harris acquires EHR training vendor Sedona Learning Solutions, which will operate as a division of the company’s IatricSystems.


HIStalk Announcements and Requests

A reader emailed me an interesting point about the historical drivers of EHR use. Meaningful Use incentives made medical practice adoption widespread, but hospitals were more motivated by the shame of the IOM’s 1999 report “To Err is Human” and Y2K, with the resulting system implementation and replacement activity taking the industry into a three-horse EHR race of Cerner, Epic, and Meditech.

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Poll respondents report quite a bit of employer-paid time off, with a surprising 29% indicating that their PTO is unlimited. Commenters suggest that maybe unlimited PTO isn’t the big gift that it seems – employees can’t tell if they are using too much compared to everyone else, and in the absence of someone else to cover their work, it’s just waiting for them when they return anyway. One commenter questions whether for-profit companies that change from accrued PTO to unlimited might be cleaning up their books in anticipation of selling the company.

New poll to your right or here: Do you feel welcome and appreciated when you contact your preferred health system by telephone, email, or in person?

Thanks to these companies for recently supporting HIStalk. Click a logo for more information.

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Webinars

None scheduled soon. Previous webinars are on our YouTube channel. Contact Lorre to present your own.


Acquisitions, Funding, Business, and Stock

Shares in the Global X Telemedicine and Digital Health ETF mirrored the Nasdaq’s performance in the past month, dropping 7%. EDOC shares are down 35% in the past 12 months versus the Nasdaq’s 11% loss.


Sales

  • Allina Health signs a $20 million contract to implement Visage 7 Workflow and Visage 7 Viewer from Visage Imaging.

People

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Dan Dwyer (Cecelia Health) joins Wildflower Health as SVP of sales.


Other

In Israel, at least five hospitals report that physicians have been sent inaccurate lab test results due to a software problem.


Sponsor Updates

  • EClinicalWorks releases a new podcast, “A Bridge to the Future of Behavioral Health.”
  • Pivot Point Consulting promotes Gisela Cuddihee to senior manager of engagement management and Tom Slowe to senior manager of engagement management, training, and activation.
  • Premier Chief Pharmacy Officer and Group VP of Supply Chain Jessica Daley and Group VP of Life Sciences Denise Juliano join CancerCare’s Board of Directors.
  • Vocera publishes a new case study, “UnityPoint Health – Allen Hospital: Relieving Nurse Burden and Strengthening Safety.”
  • Visage Imaging will exhibit at SIIM 2022 in Kissimmee, FL June 9-11.

The following HIStalk Sponsors have achieved top customer rankings, according to a recent Black Book financial solutions survey:

  • Experian Health – EMPI, hospital claims management systems
  • VisiQuate – RCM analytics
  • Premier – ERP
  • Relatient – patient financial communications & satisfaction solutions
  • Change Healthcare – financial technology digital transformation consultants

Blog Posts


Contacts

Mr. H, Lorre, Jenn, Dr. Jayne.
Get HIStalk updates.
Send news or rumors.
Contact us.

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Morning Headlines 6/3/22

June 2, 2022 Headlines No Comments

A Message from Carbon Health CEO Eren Bali

Tech-forward medical care provider Carbon Health lays off 250 employees, about 8% of its workforce, citing “changing market conditions.”

Net Health’s Tissue Analytics for Wound Care Granted Breakthrough Device Status by FDA

Net Health’s wound imaging and analysis software, Tissue Analytics, earns FDA designation of Breakthrough Device Status, the first time an EHR company has been given that distinction.

Harris Continues Healthcare Growth with Acquisition of Sedona Learning Solutions

Harris will incorporate newly-acquired Sedona Learning Solutions, which offers hospitals custom health IT learning solutions and consulting services, into its IatricSystems business unit.

News 6/3/22

June 2, 2022 News 5 Comments

Top News

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Newly launched digital holding company Accrete Health Partners – a spinoff of Bon Secours Mercy Health — acquires Nordic Consulting Partners, with no financial details provided.

Accrete is led by BSMH Chief Digital Officer Jason Szczuka, JD.


Webinars

None scheduled soon. Previous webinars are on our YouTube channel. Contact Lorre to present your own.


Acquisitions, Funding, Business, and Stock

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Oracle clears regulatory review of its acquisition of Cerner, with completion of the tender offer expected on Monday, June 6. Oracle’s update emphasizes “our new, easy-to-use systems” whose primary user interface will be hands-free voice technology and the “huge growth engine” that will result from Oracle expanding Cerner’s user base to additional countries. Oracle Chairman and CTO Larry Ellison and other Oracle executives will discuss the acquisition in a June 9 webinar titled “The Future of Healthcare.” 

Online mental health startup Cerebral will lay off an unstated number of employees this month as it undergoes a federal probe into its prescribing practices.

Tech-forward medical care provider Carbon Health lays off 250 employees, about 8% of its workforce, citing “changing market conditions” such as reduced demand for its COVID-specific services and the investor market shifting to an emphasis on profit rather than revenue growth. The company has raised more than $500 million, with valuation reaching at least $3 billion last year. The headcount reduction was reportedly focused on corporate staff.


Sales

  • VHC Health will implement Certify Health’s facial biometrics positive patient ID at all its locations, starting with pilot programs in radiology and cardiology this month. 

People

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Bamboo Health hires Guy Mansueto, MM (PartsSource) as chief marketing officer.

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Sachin Agrawal, MSc (RLDatix) joins EVisit as president.

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Southeast Health (AL) promotes Ravi Nallamothu, MD to chief health information officer.

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Brightwork, Health IT hires Tabitha Lieberman (Providence St. Joseph Health) as president of EHR and healthcare applications.

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Huron promotes Ronnie Dail to COO.


Announcements and Implementations

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Net Health’s wound imaging and analysis software, Tissue Analytics, earns FDA designation of Breakthrough Device Status, the first time an EHR company has been given that distinction.

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A new KLAS Arch Collaborative report finds that health systems fall short in meeting user expectations for EHR reliability and system response time, which are key factors for driving clinician EHR satisfaction. The report notes that system speed, which is one of the lowest-satisfaction user issues, is interpreted by users as an indicator of poor EHR reliability. Many clinicians who are dissatisfied with EHR speed or reliability also mention hardware issues and slow log-in times.


Government and Politics

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A VA OIG report says that the year-ago implementation of Cerner at Mann-Grandstaff VA Medical Center (WA) has caused gaps in performance, quality, and access metrics, with employees questioning whether the hospital can pass an upcoming Joint Commission accreditation survey. Employees are performing laborious workarounds and making best guesses since the hospital is reporting only 13 of the VA’s 103 organizational performance metrics. OIG listed challenges such as Cerner’s failure to deliver metrics reports, lack of VA resources and training, and the VA’s failure to assess EHR metrics before go-live.


Privacy and Security

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FBI Director Christopher Ray tells attendees of a cybersecurity conference that its intelligence uncovered a planned cyberattack against Boston Children’s Hospital by Iran-sponsored hackers last year, which the hospital blocked with the FBI’s help. The hospital’s systems went down for a week in 2014 from a cyberattack by a member of the Anonymous hacker group that was related to a custody battle involving a teenage patient.


Other

KHN looks at proposed “right-to-repair” laws for power wheelchairs, of which the two largest suppliers are owned by private equity firms. Users of malfunctioning wheelchairs, replacement of which is limited by insurance to every five years, face software and hardware locks, restricted access to parts and manuals, failure of lower-quality products with no coverage for preventive maintenance, and months-long waits for replacement parts as suppliers wait for insurance approval.

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In Canada, members of the equity, diversity, and inclusion committee of Hamilton Health Sciences say that Epic – on which HHS will go live this weekend in a $140 million project – does not capture information such as race, ethnicity, disability, gender, sexual orientation, language, and length of time in Canada. The hospital says it will enhance the system after go-live.


Sponsor Updates

  • EClinicalWorks publishes a new customer success story, “How Online Booking is Helping a Cardiology Practice.”
  • Cerner secures 331 new, expanded, and extended customer contracts in the first quarter of 2022.
  • CTG donates needed supplies to FeedMore WNY to support their work in local communities.
  • FDB hires Abby Yu as a clinical informatics specialist.
  • Black Book names Netsmart as the top-rated post-acute ambulatory health solutions vendor in customer satisfaction.
  • Meditech adds an Obstetric Hemorrhage Management Toolkit to its Expanse EHR.

Blog Posts


Contacts

Mr. H, Lorre, Jenn, Dr. Jayne.
Get HIStalk updates.
Send news or rumors.
Contact us.

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EPtalk by Dr. Jayne 6/2/22

June 2, 2022 Dr. Jayne 2 Comments

Surprise, surprise: research shows that patients understand their health records better when they are not full of abbreviations. The study, published in JAMA Network Open, showed improved comprehension when certain abbreviations and acronyms were spelled out. Although study subjects had previous exposure to healthcare organizations, their initial understanding of some common abbreviations was below 40%. Looking at a set of 10 common abbreviations, expanding them increased comprehension from 62% to 95%. The authors urge clinicians to consider that patients may not understand abbreviations and medical terminology. Abbreviations aside, it’s important to understand the low level of health literacy across the US and the need for most patient-facing communications to be written at or below the sixth-grade level.

I recently had another trip into the Patient Zone, and even as a healthcare provider, I found some of the things I encountered confusing. I know how to navigate the system and I still have a post-visit issue that remains unresolved three days later. The office was running significantly late, so I got to listen to quite a few inappropriately overheard conversations. One involved a staffer who kept confusing two “sound-alike” medications to the point where I wanted to step out to the clinical station and correct her. Losartan is for blood pressure, Loestrin is an oral contraceptive. I later found out that she wasn’t working in her usual clinical location because they had floated people to the office to cover shortages. Still, I hope that no one was harmed on their watch. I received some wonky directions from people in the office and it makes more sense if they were temporary staff, but the average patient might not know to question it.

I’m also trying to put myself in the shoes of patients who are receiving immediate lab results via their patient portal accounts. The clinician I saw warned me, “you’ll probably see your results before I will” and she wasn’t kidding. Barely six hours after I left the office, I started receiving a flurry of “new result available” alerts. I’m not sure how the labs were ordered, but each component of the blood work was coming back as an individual result with its own notification. It was unnerving to say the least, especially since the ones I was really waiting for weren’t among the first to return. As a physician, I know what the results mean, but as a patient I can imagine it might be very frustrating. My guess is it won’t be until sometime next week before I receive an official interpretation, once all the results have returned. I’ll be interested to see how the rest of the process goes, and if my pharmacy benefit manager will ever sort out the erroneous script that was sent. I tried to resolve it, but they were never able to find the provider’s name in their system (despite me being able to see the erroneous script from the patient-side login) so I’m betting at some point I wind up driving to the office to pick up a paper script and fax it in myself.

Needless to say, there’s a long way to go for some healthcare organizations to really embrace the idea of patient-centered design. There have been a lot of healthcare futurists over the last decade who have said that patients will vote with their feet and drive their healthcare dollars towards organizations that deliver care that is personalized and consumer friendly. Pre-pandemic I still saw the majority of patients choosing their care based on insurance coverage with very little consideration of quality metrics or anything else. Now, with all the staffing shortages and physicians leaving patient care in droves, patients seem to just be getting in wherever they can. In my area, one of the largest health systems has over 4,000 patients on its wait list for a particular specialty, which now refuses to accept any referrals from outside the health system. That doesn’t seem terribly patient-centric to me. The organization blames its inability to recruit for the shortage of clinicians. I guarantee that if they raised their salaries above 25th percentile they’d be able to recruit.

After reflecting on these recent experiences, I wasn’t sure I was in the right frame of mind to read yet another article about a “man on a mission” in healthcare. One of my shoe-loving friends has a huge crush on Glen Tullman though, so I figured I better keep up so she and I have something to chat about. The premise of Tullman’s latest venture, Transcarent, is leveling the playing field for patients as they try to meet their healthcare needs. He calls out the fact that the health insurance industry is one that doesn’t operate in the best interests of its customers. The article calls out the fact that when insurance companies profit, each dollar represents care that patients didn’t receive. Tullman proposes giving those dollars back to large, self-insured employers who are footing the bill for coverage.

It will be interesting to see if Transcarent is able to succeed where other companies have failed. Haven tried to do this a few years ago for employees of Amazon, Berkshire Hathaway, and JPMorgan Chase. So far, more than 100 companies have signed up, eager to see savings on their healthcare spending. Transcarent makes its money by taking a cut of that savings, which is achieved through pre-negotiated pricing for services as well as by directing patients to lower-cost alternatives. Corporate customers are gravitating to the approach as are health systems, some of which are financially backing the endeavor. Walmart is jumping in with a recent agreement to become a preferred provider, offering primary care, mental health, and dental services. The article was enough to hook me, so I’ll be following along as the company expands. They’ve already hired some really smart people, and I’m eager to see if they’ll be able to move the needle.

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Happy 19th Birthday HIStalk! I didn’t have time to do proper pastry therapy, so this option from my neighborhood Costco will have to do. Even though white cake is my favorite, you really can’t go wrong with a cake that is filled with their signature mousse.

What’s your favorite birthday pastry? Leave a comment or email me.

Email Dr. Jayne.

Morning Headlines 6/2/22

June 1, 2022 Headlines No Comments

Oracle Purchase of Cerner Approved

Oracle has gained the antitrust approvals necessary for its proposed $28.3 billion acquisition of Cerner, now set to take place next week.

SoftBank-Backed Telehealth Firm Cerebral Announces Layoffs

Amidst federal scrutiny and the recent ouster of its founder and CEO, Cerebral announces that it will lay off an undisclosed number of employees by July 1.

Moxe Health Raises $30M Series B to Further Advance Interoperability

Health data exchange vendor Moxe Health raises $30 million in a Series B funding round led by Piper Sandler Merchant Banking and Vensana Capital.

Accrete Health Partners Acquires Nordic Consulting Partners

Accrete Health Partners, a digital health holding company that launched in May, acquires Nordic Consulting for an undisclosed sum.

Readers Write: Answering the Call of Nurses Month: Arming Nursing Schools to Fill the Practice Gap

June 1, 2022 Readers Write No Comments

Answering the Call of Nurses Month: Arming Nursing Schools to Fill the Practice Gap
By Julie Stegman

Julie Stegman is vice president of the nursing segment of health learning, research, and practice business at Wolters Kluwer.

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The theme of Nurses Month this year is “Nurses Make a Difference.” But they can only continue to do so if they are supported in their roles, and that starts with education.

The ongoing nursing shortage has devastated hospitals across the nation, affecting patient care and driving high rates of burnout among those still practicing. And as the population continues to grow and age, demand for healthcare services will only increase. Reports project that 1.2 million new registered nurses (RNs) will be needed by 2030. To address today’s nursing crisis and empower nurses to continue making a difference, we need a collaborative approach that brings practice and academia together to improve new nurses’ confidence and competence, overall nurse retention, and to produce more nurses ready for the field, eager and product to care for patients.

While practice adjustments such as more flexible work schedules, cross training, and alternative care models can help address the current shortage by better supporting and thereby retaining nurses in the field, academia also has a significant role to play. Training new nurses efficiently and effectively is essential to meet the demands of practice today and for years to come. Yet a survey by the Association of Colleges of Nursing found over 80,000 qualified BSN applicants have been turned away from nursing school due to budgetary constraints and a lack of faculty, clinical sites, and classroom space.

During the pandemic, these challenges were exacerbated as hospitals and academic medical centers closed their doors for educational purposes because they did not want students using the limited personal protective equipment they had on hand, or to be exposed to COVID-19. Sites that had previously closed their doors to students are now becoming more available, but the underlying challenge of a lack of clinical sites continues to limit nursing school applicants.

While the adoption of simulation and other virtual technologies was already underway in nurse education before COVID-19 hit, the pandemic accelerated rapid adoption of virtual simulation, virtually overnight, to help fulfill the necessary clinical time requirements for graduation. This shift was a necessary one, as virtual simulation has proven its value as an essential resource for nursing schools to bridge the gap between classroom and clinical practice, including the use of high-fidelity manikin-based simulation, to ensure professional competency for nurses about to enter the field. It also provides an essential training resource for nurses to learn how to personalize and individualize care based on patient needs and clinical cues.

Simulation programs have offered a vital stand-in for real-world clinical sites that have been unable to take on nursing students during the pandemic. By mirroring real clinical practice, virtual simulation teaches nursing students to recognize and analyze cues such as pain, paleness, urticaria — effectively to take action and respond to unfolding visual and audio responses from the patient to improve clinical reasoning skills in a safe virtual environment. Simulated nursing education programs also offer end-to-end practice instruction, including reflective practice and debriefing after the simulated interaction is complete.

While this technology has been in use for nearly a decade, the last two years have accelerated adoption of virtual tools in and out of classrooms. Simulation can offer a sustained impact on nursing by addressing the shortage of clinical sites that has been a limiting factor to nursing school admission.

While our frontline nurses are continuing to provide care throughout this pandemic, healthcare systems are embracing the opportunity to innovate and modernize their practices to better support their nurses. At the same time, academia continues to innovate to ensure the ripple effects of the pandemic don’t impact the critical nursing education system. Effecting change at the education level is crucial and will positively affect the nursing profession as a whole, creating more practice-ready nurses who are equipped to manage the demands of real-world practice. Staring Nurses Month in the face, we need to enact immediate change at both the practice and academic level to create a more resilient nursing workforce and continue delivering the best care possible to patients.

HIStalk Interviews Waqaas Al-Siddiq, CEO, Biotricity

June 1, 2022 Interviews No Comments

Waqaas Al-Siddiq, PhD, MSc is founder and CEO of Biotricity of Redwood City, CA.

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Tell me about yourself and the company.

I’m an engineer by training. I got interested in remote patient monitoring because I did a bunch of work at my grad school in remote monitoring. One of the applications was healthcare. I took a weird road through my career, as I think all entrepreneurs do. But I really felt that the future of healthcare was going to be in remote monitoring. I founded Biotricity and the rest has been history.

How are clinicians using real-time ECG monitoring and how does that compare to old-school Holter monitors?

There’s an application for both areas. We just recently got into the Holter space as well. But our focus has been chronic patients, patients where you have a risk of a heart attack or a stroke and where 87% of patients are asymptomatic. Many of these issues are happening at nighttime while you are sleeping. Traditional solutions are recording your data, but they are not monitoring. It’s called Holter monitoring, but  the “monitoring” name and nomenclature in the industry is misleading. It is recording your data, which you then download later for analysis the week after that report.

If you are sleeping and you have chest pain and wake up in the middle of a heart attack, the real-time monitor is looking at your data continuously and analyzing. It’s a smart monitor. When it detects that you have crossed a threshold, it sends a message with that strip of data to a call center, where we have nurses who know how to read ECGs and who can deal with emergency response. You can solve the problem for high-risk patients where if they are sleeping, you can get them in, you know what’s going on, and and you can treat them.

How do outcomes change with having a clinician on the other end of a real-time monitor versus consumer phone apps, where users have to initiate the reading and then react to vague “call your doctor” warnings when the app sees something resembling atrial fibrillation?

AFib is a good example, because a lot of people have chronic AFib. A clinician on the other side knows if you need to go to the hospital, such as if you’re in heart failure and won’t survive without immediate help. The clinician has enough data and can interrogate the device to get more data. By the time you get into the hospital, they know what’s going on.

Many times with our products, we see the patient’s heart going through pauses, or AFib burden that is increasing. That means that the patient’s heart is going to stop, or they are going to end up having a stroke if the AFib burden is increasing. You get an alert at 2:00 in the morning, the nurse calls the on-call doctor, and they get the patient in. But they already know that the patient is going to stroke out, or they know that patient needs an emergency pacemaker put in. The diagnostic and the treatment has already been concluded before the patient is even there. 

You are saving the patient’s life. But more importantly, you’re avoiding muscle damage. The big part of rehabilitation is that you have a catastrophic event, you survive it, but now you’re debilitated and you have to go through rehabilitation. Or maybe it’s been so catastrophic that you are going to have to live with a worse organ or a worse condition for rest of your life because they treated you, but got there late. This is where smart monitoring can really make a difference.

Patients at home call 911 and wait for first responders to evaluate and transport them. How does the process work when your monitoring center detects a problem?

They patient won’t always even know. We have had cases where patient is taking a nap, something happens and the alert goes in, and the call center looks at it and decides, this patient is going to go into heart failure or have a stroke, so we need to get them in. The doctor is called, looks at the data, and says yes, get the patient in. Usually there’s either an on-call doctor or a prescribing doctor, depending on how they set it up, so some physician is called once the threshold is met. They will say, call the patient’s family and tell them to come to the hospital immediately. Or they will say to call 911, depending on what is happening. The physician is directing it.

Many times you call the family member and tell them to bring the patient in for an emergency intervention and they say, “Oh no, that can’t be. They are taking a nap.” We say that we understand that they are taking a nap, but you need to wake them up and get them to the hospital because they are having an emergency event.

Smart phone atrial fibrillation apps trigger a lot of false alarms and send patients to cardiologists who determine that treatment isn’t necessary. How can that process be improved?

The bare minimum for effective diagnostics in the heart world, in the ECG world, is 24 hours of continuous analysis. Apple Watches and consumer products collect 30 seconds of data. They are not providing a holistic view of the patient, and even 24 hours doesn’t give you a good chance. Holter monitors and mobile telemetry monitors are being used from seven, 21, or 30 days of continuous recording. False positives and warnings about non-issues could just be random occurrences within that 30 seconds, but in the broader spectrum of 20 days of data, it’s a blip. 

We all have these blips, but our core health is solid. Smart monitors can track and watch this, and if the blips hit a threshold, the doctor sees that. Sometimes the doctor will say, this is not an emergency and I’ll see the patient when they come in. The event doesn’t meet the requirement for an emergency intervention, but they are making that call remotely.

That also happens when the device alerts for something, it goes to the call center, and the nurse looks at it and decides that it’s an issue, but not a life-threatening one, so they might not even need to call the doctor. Or they decide that it could be life-threatening, they call the doctor, and the doctor decides that it’s not an emergency and books them an appointment within the next couple of days.

What was the business case for developing the non-prescription Bioheart chest strap monitor that is sold in the competitive consumer market?

What we see is there’s 15 million Americans, maybe 17 million now, who are diagnosed with cardiac issues. We are part of that diagnostic flow. Once they have been diagnosed, it’s a lifelong condition. Whereas diabetics have glucometers, cardiac patients have nothing.

We created Bioheart to take the technology that we use to diagnose patients and provide it in a simplified, non-diagnostic scenario for personal use. It can collect long-term data on that individual so that patients can better manage their lifestyle. It targets individuals who are diagnosed or at risk for cardiovascular issues so that they can get that broader insight, because cardiac issues are intermittent and most patients and individuals are asymptomatic. 

They don’t have any insight. Diabetics can prick a finger, collect their glucose, and now can use continuous glucose monitoring without even doing the prick — it tells you your level and you can make adjustments to your lifestyle to manage that. Cardiac issues are way more complicated because they are intermittent and many patients don’t have symptoms. You have to collect a long amount of data to determine what you should or should not be doing. We introduced the Bioheart because we felt that individuals needed a tool, and in the marketplace, 30-second and one-minute data collections are just not good enough. You really need long-term data, and that’s why we built Bioheart.

Your website mentions pain management, which is fascinating since pain is monitored as subjective patient perception rather than a physiologic measurement, with limitations that can lead to undertreatment or addiction. How do you see your cardiac issue model applying to pain management?

Exactly right, pain is very subjective. One of the reason we started looking at pain and some of those issues is because pain can manifest itself with an elevated heart rate or elevated temperature. It will show up in certain metrics, including how you are moving. With our Bioheart product and how we are moving in terms of remote monitoring, we looked at how can we quantify and align pain.

The other thing with pain is that everybody’s concept of pain is different. One person’s pain level of seven might be a pain level of two to someone else. How debilitating it is subjective. One way to contextualize that and provide some objectivity to it – it will still have to be individualized — is to look at their biometrics. Someone may have a pain of seven, another a pain level of two, but both of them have elevated heart rates. One person has a natural tendency to deal with a certain kind of pain better than another. Another thing is the types of pain that individuals have. Some people can handle throbbing pain, other people can handle sharp pain. It’s all over the map. 

Our focus is to try to provide objectivity and link it to remote monitoring so that we can use data to support and provide insight to individuals so that they can better manage their conditions.

How do you see pain monitoring evolving into a business?

As we grow and as we continue to make inroads from a business perspective, it’s a service that we are providing to bring in that objectivity. We are not really focused on the nuts and bolts of revenue, rather that we have the technology, it’s helpful, and let’s make it available and we will provide it at free of cost. 

Long term, how it will transform into a business is that a lot of pain docs need a data point that individuals are engaged with. If they can do that, then they can bring that as a part of their way of managing pain for those patients. The commercialization, the business, will align pain specialists and make it a part of their assets and toolkit to help manage individuals’ pain. In that regard, we can create reporting and ink that to reimbursement. If we can achieve the goal and show outcomes that this tool is effective and offers objectivity that makes sense, then that is something that will become commercialized with insurance and we will have a commercialization pathway.

What are the company’s goals over the next three or four years?

One is to build our diagnostic product. We have multiple products coming out with the Bioheart and with the Holter solution. The next year or 18 months is about transforming into a platform company and building the entire cardiac ecosystem so we can track a cardiac patient from diagnostic all the way to disease management and have multiple touch points with them through their cardiac journey. We are with them every step of the way, and so building that brand.

Then 18 months after that, to democratize cardiac care and delivery across the United States. There aren’t many cardiologists — 70 million people at risk, 17 million diagnosed, and 25,000 cardiologists. It’s just too many patients. Many of these individuals have no access. In the smaller suburbs and rural areas, your access to the specialist is limited at best. We create time if we can make cardiologists who use our platform and technology more efficient. It allows them to focus on the patients that matter and the patients that are stable. We enable them with the tools to manage their conditions and we create time. Creating time and efficiency for cardiologists allows us to improve access. We can use digital help and virtual care to do remote diagnostics and deliver care across the spectrum. That’s our goal and our vision.

In three or four years, you will see a very different company. We are laying the groundwork today. I always joke with my team internally and my reps that everybody thinks Biotricity is playing checkers, but we are playing chess. We are releasing components of a broader picture that will create a domino effect three or four years from now, where we provide accessibility to cardiac solutions and cardiologists in an easy way by big technology, as a conduit for not only those individuals who are stable, but also to create efficiencies so that access is improved.

Morning Headlines 6/1/22

May 31, 2022 Headlines No Comments

Lightbeam Acquires Jvion AI and SDOH Solutions

Population health management vendor Lightbeam Health Solutions will acquire Jvion, which specializes in AI-powered predictive analytics and social determinants of health software.

Cerner ticks higher on report Oracle deal targeted for mid-June close

Oracle’s acquisition of Cerner is reported to be on track to close within the next couple of weeks.

By Light Awarded $82M VA Contract

The VA awards By Light Professional IT Services a five-year, $82 million contract for the continued development, security, and operation of its My HealtheVet patient portal.

News 6/1/22

May 31, 2022 News 2 Comments

Top News

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Population health management vendor Lightbeam Health Solutions will acquire Jvion, an Atlanta-based company that specializes in AI-powered predictive analytics and social determinants of health software.

Lightbeam acquired remote patient monitoring startup CareSignal last November.


HIStalk Announcements and Requests

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Poll respondents most commonly expect the stock market downturn to cause companies to cut expenses, employees to keep working for the same employer longer, and for vendors to buy each other.

New poll to your right or here: How much annual paid vacation time / PTO do you get from your employer?

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HIStalk’s 19th birthday is this week. I started putting my thoughts online on June 3, 2003 since I had no hobbies outside my health system IT executive job. That’s a lot of blank screens filled since.


Webinars

None scheduled soon. Previous webinars are on our YouTube channel. Contact Lorre to present your own.


Acquisitions, Funding, Business, and Stock

Oracle’s acquisition of Cerner is reported to be on track to close within the next couple of weeks.


Sales

  • St. Peter’s Health (MT) selects the Innovaccer Health Cloud Data Activation Platform to unify patient records across its facilities.

People

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Divurgent names Bismoy Beura (Tata Consultancy Services) VP of client services.

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Christine Havlin, RN (Optum) joins MobileSmith as chief marketing officer.

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Medecision promotes Terri Steinberg, MD, MBA to chief strategy officer / chief medical officer.

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Transcarent names Tim Rosa (Fitbit) chief marketing officer.

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Gerry Lewis (Ascension) joins US Radiology Specialists as CIO.

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World Wide Technology hires Erin Jospe, MD (Kyruus) as chief healthcare advisor.

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Provation Medical promotes Craig Moriarty, MS to chief revenue officer.

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Baystate Health hires Kevin Conway (Tegria) as SVP/chief information and digital officer.

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Change Healthcare promotes Archie Mayani, MBA to SVP and chief product officer of decision support.


Announcements and Implementations

Hospital General Menonita and Manati Medical Center in Puerto Rico adopt CloudWave’s OpSus Live cloud hosting service.

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The Connecticut Children’s Neonatal ICU at UConn Health will go live on Epic later this month.

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In Pennsylvania, Butler Health System launches a telemedicine clinic at Rimersburg Medical Center that was developed by Butler surgeon Rod Stevenson, MD.

Pawnee Valley Community Hospital (KS) transitions its family medicine clinic to Meditech.


Government and Politics

The VA awards By Light Professional IT Services a five-year, $82 million contract for the continued development, security, and operation of its My HealtheVet patient portal.


Other

WVU Medicine Children’s has increased its urology telemedicine clinics from three to four, with a fifth in the works, after an internal study found that virtual visits between 2018 and 2020 were clinically effective and saved families an average of nearly five hours in driving time and $175 in fuel.

Bizarre: two male avatars on Meta’s social networking platform invite the avatar of a female human behavior researcher to a private virtual party, then rape her avatar as they make lewd comments and pass a bottle of virtual alcohol between them. The researcher says it was especially creepy because the Oculus VR headset transmitted physical sensations to her controller when the male avatars touched her. Another researcher says that within 60 seconds of joining the same VR platform, a group of male avatars sexually assaulted hers.


Sponsor Updates

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  • CTG staff donate items for the Community Baby Shower hosted by the United Way of Buffalo & Erie County.
  • EClinicalWorks publishes a new customer success story featuring Provida Family Medicine, “How the EClinicalWorks EHR Integrates Data from Other EHRs.”
  • AGS Health publishes a new e-book, “5 Reasons to Select AGS Health as Your Offshore Service Provider.”
  • WellSpan Health profiles the success its physicians have had using Nuance’s Dragon Ambient EXperience AI-powered voice recognition software to automatically transcribe patient visits.
  • Baker Tilly will present at the Healthcare Capital Markets & Innovation Summit June 1 in Columbus.
  • Bamboo Health has co-sponsored the Columbia River Mental Health Services Spring 2022 Gala.
  • Cerner releases a new podcast, “How COVID-19 impacted consumerism and how healthcare organizations can adapt.”
  • Clearwater publishes a new case study, “Owensboro Health on Taking Cyber Risk Management Beyond the EHR.”

Blog Posts


Contacts

Mr. H, Lorre, Jenn, Dr. Jayne.
Get HIStalk updates.
Send news or rumors.
Contact us.

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