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Healthcare AI News 5/24/23

May 24, 2023 Healthcare AI News 4 Comments

News

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Microsoft will integrate ChatGPT into Windows 11, where it will run in its own Copilot window as a personal assistant to perform Windows commands and summarize documents that are dragged into it. The user rollout will start in June.

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Tell, whose app allows users to seek advice from medical experts, integrates ChatGPT to translate medical jargon into accessible language.

OpenAI says that AI systems will exceed expert level in most domains within 10 years and recommends steps to mitigate its risks:

  • Coordinate development efforts across countries and hold companies to a high standard of responsibility.
  • Create an organization similar to the International Atomic Energy Agency provide oversight and inspection AI efforts that exceed a specific level of capability or resource requirements.
  • Develop technical capabilities to make superintelligence safe.

OpenAI launches a ChatGPT app for the IPhone.

In Pakistan, the government of Punjab launches a two-hospital pilot of using AI to assist in diagnosis.

Google launches the Google for Startups Growth Academy: AI for Health program for companies based in Europe, Middle East, and Africa. Startups from seed to Series A will be offered a three-month virtual program of tailored workshops, collaboration, and mentorship.


Business

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Alicja AI offers a $500 per month enterprise clinical documentation tool that integrates with EHRs. 


Research

ChatGPT has passed several medical exams, but researchers find that it falls just short of passing the American College of Gastroenterology Self-Assessment Tests.

A University of Arizona Health Sciences-led study finds that participants are almost evenly split in preferring a human doctor versus AI for diagnosis and treatment. The authors recommend further research about how AI can be incorporated into the work of physicians and the decision-making process of patients. 


Other

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Business Insider profiles ED physician and two-company VP of innovation Joshua Tamayo-Sarver, MD, PhD, who says that it “probably should be embarrassing” that has sometime uses ChatGPT to explain medical issues in patient-friendly terms. He concludes that ChatGPT is “the most brilliant, talented, often drunk intern you could imagine” that is great at explaining concepts but not good at diagnosis or other tasks that require clinical reasoning.

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Kaiser Permanente ED doctor and technologist Graham Walker, MD pens an excellent piece on how he views AI as a physician:

  • AI can pass a medical school exam, which involves basic multiple choice questions, but that capability is not very related to interacting with patients to determine their multiple issues and their viewpoints about options.
  • Doctors know how to successfully address a patient problem up to 95% of the time due to their specialization, residency training, and repeated exposure to the same common issues, and therefore would see no value in asking a “medical bot” for recommendations.
  • Where AI could help is to differentiate among possible problems that exhibit similar symptoms.
  • AI might offer a convincingly objective second opinion to a patient who is told, for example, that they don’t need antibiotics for a viral infection.
  • He says he would “virtually hug and kiss a digital agent” that could generate discharge instructions, describe the logic behind the chosen medical plan, and answer questions are likely to have.
  • AI could help identify and correct confirmation bias, where the doctor needs fresh perspective to see that evidence might not support the suspected diagnosis.
  • AI could help steer an ED patient to local sources of help that might be better than the ED.
  • AI could help doctors and patients understand why lab tests may not be indicated and how to react to positive or negative results.

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Currently there are "4 comments" on this Article:

  1. I liked the comments by Graham Walker regarding AI.

    One thing I take a bit of issue with is this.

    “AI could help identify and correct confirmation bias, where the doctor needs fresh perspective to see that evidence might not support the suspected diagnosis.”

    While true on it’s face, I strongly suspect that anyone suffering from confirmation bias, doesn’t have the correct mindset to seek this kind of help. Or having the AI input, the confirmation bias will prevent the doctor from taking the advice seriously. Instead there will be a pro-forma response beginning with “Yeah but…”.

    To correct confirmation bias, you need the practitioner to seek out assistance from someone they seriously respect. An AI is going to have immense difficulty establishing itself as such an authority, from which difficult news will be appropriately received.

    Otherwise, very worthwhile commentary!

  2. “Doctors know how to successfully address a patient problem up to 95% of the time due to their specialization, residency training, and repeated exposure to the same common issues, and therefore would see no value in asking a “medical bot” for recommendations.” A family member in her 60’s recently got her LE MRI back and the orthopedic doctor office called her to schedule an appointment to discuss options. I took the MRI result, plugged it into chatgpt and asked it to break it down as to what the result meant, what the prognosis was, what possible treatments were available, what could be done in the meantime, etc. ….Got all the info, gave it to the family member and she was relieved to be “informed” of all her options before her appointment.

    After the appointment she told me that b/c she had read the AI report, she felt a lot more comfortable talking to the doctor as she already knew what was coming and she was ready to ask pertinent questions. In fact, she felt the doctor was not as detailed as the chatgpt printout i gave her. The biggest value i saw from that experience was, patient being prepared for the appointment and ready to ask pertinent questions about condition. This doctor sounds like those tech writers in the 90’s saying that the internet would collapse: Robert Metcalfe, the inventor of the Ethernet, declared in the December 1995 edition of Infoworld, that the internet would have failed by 1996. “I predict the Internet will soon go spectacularly supernova and in 1996 catastrophically collapse.” How that turn out, doc?

  3. REPLY: In India, the government of Pubjab launches a two-hospital pilot of using AI to assist in diagnosis.

    Small typo, and a nuance – Punjab in Pakistan, not Indian one. It was one Punjab (five rivers) till about 75 years ago

    Love the progress by a care taker government to use advanced technologies at provincial level. Kudos

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