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EPtalk with Dr. Jayne 10/18/18

October 18, 2018 Dr. Jayne No Comments

A reader recently asked how/where I keep my own personal medical records. I may have written about it in the past, but my strategy is always evolving, so I’ll share my answer. From my college and medical school days, I have a few paper documents, mostly pathology reports printed from our hospital’s HIM system, and an original vaccination record from our student health clinic. The vaccinations I also keep as a PDF, which becomes useful when I have to turn in my annual health form to volunteer at a youth summer camp. I always chuckle when I have to transfer that data, because I received my last two non-influenza vaccinations (Hepatitis A and Tdap) only because my staff mistakenly drew up doses that were going to have to go to waste, so I had them “waste” the vaccine into my left deltoid.

Beyond that, I have a thumb drive with my entire OB/GYN medical record, provided to me by my physician when she closed her practice. I’m pretty sure it’s not encrypted, and I’ve summarized the important parts into a Word document. I used to have an account on a commercial patient health record courtesy of my employer, but it was clunky and cumbersome, and frankly just creating my own word document was more useful. My genetic counseling records are all on paper, given to me at the end of my visit by my counselor. Her office does not store records electronically or communicate via patient portal. It’s very old-school. When my local health system began their conversion to Epic last year, I did download all my records from their portal, storing them as PDFs on my OneDrive. That way, I can access them from anywhere should I need them. I also store copies of my living will and healthcare power of attorney on the OneDrive, because I’ve seen too many bad things happen and I trot those documents out as needed.

It’s not an elegant solution, but as a physician I have a pretty good handle on my health status and can quickly put my fingers on the data I need even, if it’s not very well organized or categorized. I’m relatively young and healthy, so I don’t have a lot of records to track. I love the idea of patients having their own curated records that they can share, but that concept still scares a lot of physicians silly. I’ve seen some really good solutions on the market, but there hasn’t really been a lot of traction with patients, even with Apple on the scene. I do have an iBlueButton account with Humetrix, although I haven’t used it in a while. Hopefully I’ll stay healthy with no additional data to add.

Speaking of staying healthy, many of us in clinical informatics pride ourselves on delivering evidence-based care using robust clinical decision support tools. Still, the last mile in making evidence-based care a reality is often the conversation between the clinician, his or her staff, and the patient. During this year’s influenza vaccination season, we’re seeing patients who are resistant to the vaccine because of the perception that it was ineffective last year. This is borne out in a recent survey by Stericycle, which notes that a third of US respondents don’t plan to get a flu shot this year. Last year, influenza killed more than 80,000 people, but the data doesn’t appear to sway these folks. My staff has practiced and role-played various talk-tracks for patients, so we’ll have to see if we can continue to convince our patients that it’s the right thing to do. For certain, we’ll be getting an EHR-delivered score card at the end, so every vaccination counts.

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I recently learned about the Neighborhood Navigator tool, released by the EveryONE Project in partnership with the American Academy of Family Physicians. The tool uses more than 100 languages and integrates with Google Maps to help patients find directions and connect with social services for needs such as food, housing, transportation, employment, legal services, and more. There is a set of training videos for physicians to help them understand the tool and how to best refer patients.

My colleagues in the physician lounge often lament the changes in healthcare brought on by the growing presence of the Internet and the rise of social media in everyday life. Data from recent surveys reveals some interesting statistics: 54 percent of millennials (and 42 percent of all adults) have either “friended” their provider on social media or would like to do so; 65 percent of millennials (and 43 percent of all adults) find social media appropriate to use to contact their provider about a health issue; and 32 percent of those surveyed have taken a health-related action as a result of information they read on social media.

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I stumbled across the “Shots by AAFP/STFM” app in the Google Play store. It includes full CDC vaccine schedules and footnotes, as well as dosing information, contraindications, and catch-up schedule information for all available vaccines. Content is written by immunization experts at the Society of Teachers of Family Medicine. You can also enter a patient’s age and various parameters to get a recommendation on what vaccinations are needed. I use multiple resources in trying to figure out vaccine schedules for people, so I’m looking forward to giving this a try to see if it will be my new one-stop-shop. It’s also available on iTunes.

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My slow day in the clinic allowed for a lot of Web surfing in between studying for boards, and I also stumbled upon ePrognosis from University of California, San Francisco. The site’s goal is “to be a repository of published geriatric prognostic indices where clinicians can go to obtain evidence-based information on patients’ prognosis.” I ran the profiles of my favorite community-living nonagenarians, and it looks like the odds of them continuing to do well are very good indeed.

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Working at an urgent care that also provides occupational medicine services, we see a number of patients who come in for drug screens. Many employers require these to be observed drug screens, so that there is no question of an employee substituting someone else’s urine sample. I chuckled when I saw this feature on a Florida convenience store that has had to put up a sign telling users not to microwave urine samples. Even our drug screens that are not observed include taking the temperature of the sample to make sure it’s within a valid physiological range, so if someone were going to try to microwave it, they’d have to get it just right. Still, it makes one think twice about using a public microwave.

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