Home » Readers Write » Currently Reading:

Readers Write: If I Were the Health IT King: A Royal Perspective on 2018 Trends

January 10, 2018 Readers Write 2 Comments

If I Were the Health IT King: A Royal Perspective on 2018 Trends
By Jay Anders, MS, MD


Jay Anders, MS, MD is chief medical officer of Medicomp Systems of Chantilly, VA.

If I were king of health IT, I would find great joy in sitting at the head of a banquet table before all my subjects, casting judgment on the most current health IT trends. Like the king in Bud Light’s recent commercial series, I’d love to lead a hearty “dilly dilly cheer for innovations that make it easier for physicians to practice medicine, while banishing the less worthy trends to the “pit of misery.”

Health IT king or not, I see the following 2018 health IT-related trends falling into two distinct buckets.

Deserving Dilly Dilly Cheers


At long last, health systems seem to be accepting the inevitability of interoperability. Organizations are resigned to the fact that it’s no longer reasonable to refuse to share patients’ clinical records with cross-town competitors. Instead, everyone needs to work together to make systems talk. The growing acceptance of standards such as FHIR are also helping to advance interoperability efforts. I predict significantly more progress in this area over the next three to five years.

Collaboration with Physicians

More health IT companies are seeking input from physician users as they design, build, and test their solutions. Vendors are realizing that the creation of user-friendly clinical interfaces can no longer be an afterthought and that the delivery of physician-friendly solutions must be a priority. By collaborating with physicians, vendors better understand required clinician workflows, existing bottlenecks, and the processes that are critical to patient safety.

For example, physicians can provide insights into common clinician thought processes and clarify why one workflow may be preferred over another. Physicians understand what tasks are traditionally performed by a medical assistant, how long a particular procedure might take, and when and why a clinician cannot be looking at a computer screen. By embracing physician collaboration, health IT companies are better-equipped to create innovative solutions that work and think like physicians and enhance provider satisfaction.

Shared Chart Ownership

Not too many years ago, most people — including patients — believed that each physician owned his or her own patient charts. That mindset is changing, and today, most providers and patients realize that everyone involved in a patient’s care — including the patient’s family — needs to share clinical data. The growing recognition that information must flow seamlessly between caregivers is a huge step in the right direction and advances industry efforts to get the right information to the right person at the right time.

Banished to the Pit of Misery

Data Dumping

More data is being exchanged between providers thanks to better interoperability tools and growing enterprise acceptance. Unfortunately, many organizations continue to struggle to figure out what to do with all the data. More health systems have the ability to dump buckets of data on providers, yet few physicians have the tools to efficiently organize the data into actionable information that enhances patient care. Don’t look for any widespread fixes in the short term.

Administrative Burdens

Healthcare still has not figured out how to reduce the administrative burdens of practicing medicine. Physicians continue to be frustrated and disillusioned with their careers, thanks to ever-changing regulatory and reimbursement requirements that require adjustments to clinical workflows. Don’t expect big improvements any time soon, nor major legislation that streamlines existing healthcare policies and regulations. Instead, physicians will be forced to continue addressing numerous tasks that distract from the delivery of patient care.

AI Hype

Despite all the hype, don’t look to artificial intelligence and machine learning technologies to solve all the industry’s data and reporting problems. The bottom line is that these technologies are still insufficiently mature for healthcare applications. Providers would of course love solutions that leverage natural language processing (NLP). AI will have the ability to convert dictated chart notes to free text and free text to data that is actionable for clinicians. Unfortunately, the error rates for converting speech to text to data are, at best, between eight and 10 percent. Give these technologies at least two to three more years before they’re ready able to truly enhance clinical decision-making at the point of care and move out the pit of misery and earn dilly dilly cheers.

Ah, if only I were the Health IT King and had the power to fix inefficient systems that impair clinician productivity. I cheer dilly dilly to all who seek to embrace the knowledge and expertise of physicians to deliver highly-usable solutions. I am confident that their efforts will make physicians happier and more productive and enhance the delivery of quality patient care.

View/Print Text Only View/Print Text Only

HIStalk Featured Sponsors


Currently there are "2 comments" on this Article:

  1. Physician collaboration is frequently sought after by vendors but, unfortunately, many times when an EHR is being implemented at a site, the physician assigned to the project perceives the role as a form of punishment and tends to “check out” of the process with little participation, thus the other providers within the organization are left with the IT’s best guess at what needs to be done. Those facilities that have looked upon the role as an innovator with the opportunity to encourage change with valuable feedback are the successful ones. Often times configuration is available but hospitals elect, due to maintenance requirements, not to offer the workflow to the providers, thus resulting in dissatisfaction and the perception of inflexibility into the workflow and screen designs. There are definitely issues, software is not always pliable enough to accommodate providers needs but with existing tools, providers could offer more input with a greater level of satisfaction if the right liaison representatives are active participants in the process. Your other points are well taken.

Subscribe to Updates



Text Ads

Report News and Rumors

No title

Anonymous online form
Rumor line: 801.HIT.NEWS



Founding Sponsors


Platinum Sponsors































































Gold Sponsors















Reader Comments

  • Lee David Milligan: Rob: thanks for the comment. Agree with your point re: unique expectations and complexity....
  • Shelly: Thank you Ed for taking the time to invest in the industry as you have done - with this blog as a sounding board for CIO...
  • Appreciatve: Thanks,, Ed. This was a very nice piece, and telling of what you cherish most. There is one topic that I am not cert...
  • Rob Price: Excellent information and quite consistent with my experiences since 1999 working with three different software companie...
  • Cosmos: Thank you for the interesting article. FYI - the terms "Severe Sepsis" and "Septicemia" are no longer in common use, ...
  • Joel: Thanks for sharing for all of these years. I have appreciated the insight and will miss it!...
  • Ann Farrell: Janet - insightful as always. I remain a fan. Concerned staffing levels "at max" knowing early pt. surveillance syst...
  • James: Another beautiful piece!!!! Lesson to many and impressed about your journey. Thank you for all you share....
  • Bob: Actually Equinox/Solstice (angle of the equator w.r.t. the solar plane) are independent of the Aphelion/Perihelion (dist...
  • Fan: I've been reading your blog since before I became a CIO and haven't missed one in the years since I grew into the role. ...

Sponsor Quick Links