Home » Readers Write » Currently Reading:

Readers Write: Guaranteeing MACRA Compliance at the Point of Care

October 5, 2016 Readers Write No Comments

Guaranteeing MACRA Compliance at the Point of Care
By David Lareau


MACRA will affect every physician and every clinical encounter. Current systems have been designed to produce transactions to be billed. MACRA will require that clinical conditions have been addressed and documented in accordance with quality care guidelines. The only way to ensure that happens is to do it at the point of care.

The challenge is that physicians need to address all conditions, not just those covered by a MACRA requirement. One approach is to just add another set of things to do, slowing doctors down and getting in their way. This is the transactional approach — just another task.

Most current systems have different tabs that list problems, medications, labs, etc. Users must switch back and forth looking for data. The data cannot be organized by problem since the systems lack any method for correlating information based on clinical condition. Adding another set of disconnected information to satisfy quality measures will only make it worse for users.

A better approach is to integrate quality care requirements for any condition with all the other issues the physician needs to address for a specific patient and to work it into a physician’s typical workflow. A well-designed EHR should have a process running in the background that keeps track of all applicable quality measures and guidelines for the patient being seen. The status of all quality measures must be available at any point in the encounter in a format that ties all information together for any clinical issue.

This requires actionable, problem-oriented views of clinical data, where all information for any clinical issue is available instantly. Physicians need to be able to view, react to, and document clinical information for every problem or issue addressed with the patient. This includes history and physical documentation, review of results, clinical assessments, and treatment plans as well as compliance with quality measures.

Guaranteeing MACRA compliance at the point of care can be accomplished by using a clinical knowledge engine that presents all relevant information for any clinical issue so that MACRA quality measures are seamlessly included as part of the patient’s overall clinical picture, not as just another task to be added on to the already burdensome workflows of current systems.

David Lareau is CEO of Medicomp Systems of Chantilly, VA.

View/Print Text Only View/Print Text Only

HIStalk Featured Sponsors


Subscribe to Updates



Text Ads

Report News and Rumors

No title

Anonymous online form
Rumor line: 801.HIT.NEWS



Founding Sponsors


Platinum Sponsors































































Gold Sponsors















Reader Comments

  • richie: Wonderful topic (I'm biased as I strive to implement systems I'd want, prior to my own long-term care becoming imminent)...
  • richie: Thanks Ed, I'm impressed by your ability to pursue new endeavors....
  • Melissa: I have enjoyed your posts every month, and have followed you through your life changes as well as mine. Thank you for a...
  • Edward Marx: That would make for a good post! Let me think on it and look for me on LinkedIn....
  • Rebecca: Thank you, Ed. I always looked forward to your posts - they were a validation to me that you don't have to have to be a...
  • Lee David Milligan: Rob: thanks for the comment. Agree with your point re: unique expectations and complexity....
  • Shelly: Thank you Ed for taking the time to invest in the industry as you have done - with this blog as a sounding board for CIO...
  • Appreciatve: Thanks,, Ed. This was a very nice piece, and telling of what you cherish most. There is one topic that I am not cert...
  • Rob Price: Excellent information and quite consistent with my experiences since 1999 working with three different software companie...
  • Cosmos: Thank you for the interesting article. FYI - the terms "Severe Sepsis" and "Septicemia" are no longer in common use, ...

Sponsor Quick Links