Home » Editorials » Currently Reading:

Happy New Year – Now Get Back to Work

January 9, 2008 Editorials No Comments

Inside Healthcare Computing has graciously agreed to make previous Mr. HIStalk editorials available from its newsletter as a weekly “Best Of” series for HIStalk. This editorial originally appeared in the newsletter in January 2007. Inside Healthcare Computing subscribers receive a new editorial every week in their Electronic Update.

Happy New Year! Considering the alternative, be glad that you were alive and well enough to eat and drink too much over the past couple of weeks. Now get back to work!

You’ll notice your local newspaper, having slyly given many of the real news staff time off for the holidays, is padding out their already-slim editions with time-insensitive material written in advance or copied off the wire services: witless phony New Year’s resolutions for local politicians, tired rosters of the biggest local stories and celebrity deaths of 2006, and pleas for donations to community causes.

I can see why. Healthcare IT news is sparse this time of year. No one wants to bring out new products, start implementations, hire or fire people, or make changes in the strategic plan when no one is paying attention (hmm: that would actually be good time to announce bad news, wouldn’t it?)

If our industry was a sport, the season would actually begin at the HIMSS conference in late February. It sets the tone for the year to follow, as everyone saves up positive announcements to coincide with the annual bacchanal. Vendors who make a bad impression at HIMSS will find it difficult to recover throughout the year, with attendees critically evaluating their demonstrations, booth size, staff attire, and cheery spirit or lack thereof. Even those companies in imminent danger of collapse spend the equivalent of a small country’s gross domestic product on one glorious, go-for-broke HIMSS splash, hoping against odds to get their money’s worth in new business.

Hospitals, too, get busy after months of letting IT projects lie fallow. No wonder ROI is hard to come by when projects come to a screeching halt because of non-IT staff refusal to get involved during (a) the November to January holiday block; (b) summer vacations; (c) school spring breaks; (d) impending JCAHO or state inspection visits; and (e) local, state, or national conferences involving anyone remotely involved. No wonder implementations take forever – they’re on hiatus half the year.

CIOs have plenty of work to do. All those clinical systems projects still need to be finished. Celebrate the completion of major phases with some downtime and reflection, don’t forget to keep pushing at needed process changes and system improvements, and then jump into the next round of work. Clinical systems projects are like painting the Golden Gate Bridge: they’re never finished.

Speaking of clinical systems, if you haven’t yet made a commitment to bedside barcode verification of medications, then now’s the time. Same, too, with tightening up your Pyxis access with biometric security, override vigilance, and double-checked stocking procedures.

Microsoft has a new operating system and Office version – yay! Users will be upgrading at home, scornfully wondering why your IT department is holding them back in the Stone Age with systems they shamefully underuse anyway. You needed that non-strategic headache, right? At least PC hardware keeps getting cheaper, right about the time Vista will eat up more of it.

RHIOs will want your attention in 2007. Your data, too. Maybe now’s the time to catalog all the electronic data elements you have available and to develop a plan to move important paper-based ones to electronic formats.

If you haven’t already, let one of your computer geeks play around (officially) with Linux, both server and desktop. If you aren’t running it at all now, you will be soon.

Stark relaxation means you may need to support a new class of impatient, computer-illiterate users: doctors in private practice and the inconsistent employees they hire. Keep stats to get budget dollars since those support hours have to come from somewhere.

Lastly, if you’re in management, please make sure to recognize and reward those who work for you. When you get too full of yourself, make a list of which essential personnel would be needed in case of system failure, natural disaster, or clinical emergency. You’re probably not on it.

I hope our industry and all of us working in it have an excellent 2007. If in doubt about a particular course of action, remember WWIWAAP (which you may pronounce WEE-WEE-WAP, since I just made it up): what would I want as a patient?

This editorial is copyright-protected by Algonquin Professional Publishing, LLC., publishers of Inside Healthcare Computing. Please do not copy, forward, or reproduce this material without prior permission. To obtain permission or for more information about Inside Healthcare Computing’s reprint policy, please contact the Customer Service Department at 877-690-1871 or go to http://insidehealth.com/ihcwebsite/reprints.html.

Mr. HIStalk’s editorials appear each Thursday morning in the subscribers-only version of Inside Healthcare Computing’s E-News Update. To subscribe, please go to: https://insidehealth.com/ihcwebsite/subscribe.html or call 877-690-1871.

View/Print Text Only View/Print Text Only


HIStalk Featured Sponsors

     







Subscribe to Updates

Search


Loading

Text Ads


Report News and Rumors

No title

Anonymous online form
E-mail
Rumor line: 801.HIT.NEWS

Tweets

Archives

Founding Sponsors


 

Platinum Sponsors


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Gold Sponsors


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Reader Comments

  • EHR Guy: I enjoyed your comments about Epic and their CEO Judy. In watching and being in the industry over the years as Epic has ...
  • EHR Guy: how so... Pretty straight forward. Please explain if you are going to comment....
  • EHR Gal: This was incoherent. Please edit and try again....
  • EHR Guy: I enjoyed your comments about Epic and their CEO Judy. In watching and being in the industry over the years as Epic has...
  • KP Alum: Re the Kaiser Permanente medical school: I think it makes a lot of sense for them to train physicians in how Permanente ...
  • EHRVendor: Good article, unfortunately, this lost credibility when Athenahealth was considered one of the five major EHR Vendors le...
  • Patient advocate: Hi. I don’t see our organization on the Commonwell slide. We have gotten a lot of value from the tool and have ac...
  • Anonymous: I worked for Cerner at the time of the fire, and Cerner had a few dozen associates at the Feather River facilities. Both...
  • monica: 'Champions of Heath' that is perfect and says more about the whole rebranding strategy in 3 words than I could in a para...
  • Bill Spooner: It would be great to know about healthcare costs and outcomes in China, India and Norway, to learn how the various care ...

Sponsor Quick Links