Home » Headlines » Currently Reading:

Morning Headlines 12/27/13

December 26, 2013 Headlines 2 Comments

Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) and Office of Inspector General (OIG) Extend Sunset Dates for Electronic Health Records (EHR) Subsidy Rules

CMS extends the sunset date on the Stark exception to December 31, 2021. The decision will allow hospitals to continue to finance EHR implementations for referring physician practices without breaking anti-kickback laws.

More partnerships between doctors and hospitals strengthen coordinated care for Medicare beneficiaries

123 new ACOs are announced, bringing the national total to 360.

MaineHealth increasing spending on software system that was involved with billing glitches

MaineHealth will increase the budget on its Epic install from $145 to $200 million. Bill Caron, president of MaineHealth, says that the health system underestimated the total cost of training all its staff on Epic, and acknowledges that it was a mistake to start the install at 600-bed Maine Medical Center, the systems largest hospital.  The additional funding will be used to provide end users additional Epic training.

EMR alert cuts sepsis deaths

Active surveillance alerts generated by the EHR at Mount Sinai Hospital (NY) have led to earlier detection of sepsis in its inpatient census, resulting in a 40 percent reduction in its sepsis mortality rate.

View/Print Text Only View/Print Text Only


HIStalk Featured Sponsors

     

2 Responses to “Morning Headlines 12/27/13”

  1. 1
    Jenny Dimento, MBA Says:

    Happy New Year to all at Histalk!

    SEPSIS WARNINGS: What a brilliant idea to use the EMR alerts to warn of incipient sepsis to solve the problem created by the hospitals that use technology that distances nurses and doctors from the patients and creates the silent silo syndrome.

    What is the problem that is solved? First, for at least 2 decades, the hospitals employed the low paid patient care techs to obtain the vital signs (to save money). The patient care techs have no idea what they are measuring and the RNs never see the vital signs cause the techs enter them in the medical record. Thus, the vital signs were depreciated to no longer being vital.

    Modern medical care now entails the tech hooking the patient to a machine that measures the vital signs (? accuracy) and transmits them directly to the EHR silos; where no one sees them (the silent silo syndrome) unless they specifically search for them (not to mention the user unfriendly presentations of the vital signs, devoid of any consideration of human factors).

    Q.E.D. The EMR is not doing anything that a good RN does not do, if the RN actually saw the vital signs!

  2. 2
    Gopal Singh Says:

    When I read of the ongoing softening of the Stark Laws to promote the dissemination of EHR technology, I reached for the anti emetics. This is the first step to physician obedience to the hospitals’ CEOs and puts them on the track to be employed by the hospital.

    Doctors are being sucked in to hospital control with no way out. It is a little known fact that the hospitals are now firing doctors at a high rate now that they have gotten control of the patients in the practice.

    Additionally, it facilitates the cut and paste fraud and upcoding by the doctors who try to please the admin by keeping their billing up to the goals.

Leave a Reply

Founding Sponsors


 

Subscribe to Updates

   

Search


Loading

Tweets

Report News and Rumors

No title

Anonymous online form
E-mail
Rumor line: 801.HIT.NEWS

Archives

Sponsor Quick Links

Platinum Sponsors


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Gold Sponsors


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Follow

Reader Comments

  • Mario S: The Boston Globe article on the errors related to EHRs is quite biased. Imagine a similar article emphasizing the dange...
  • Safety First: Interesting that the causes of errors "related to EHRs" are not compared directly to the errors associated with paper re...
  • Raechel Wright: Great write-up, glad to see progress being made. As developers come up the skill curve (health care is a little late to...
  • The Trip: How about instead of Carl, you use Rodney Dangerfield? No, still violates LinkedIn's policy? How about God?...
  • Bignurse: Fantastic, next-generation thinking that merges patient-centered concepts with EMR. Data is the key and we need to thin...

Text Ads